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I also cannot see the pick, not even the linked pic.

Broke stud, I gather is in the engine block correct?

Items needed:

Jack
2' long 2x4"
Tools to remove passenger motor mount
Drill (possibly a right angle)
3 - Left handed drill bits (1/8, 1/4, 5/16")
Bolt extractor to fit a 5/16" hole
Center Punch
Hammer
Time & Patience

a) Use jack and board to support motor.

b) Remove motor mount.

c) Take time (this is really critical) and center punch the stud as close as possible to the center of the stud. Then do it again and again. You need a deep center mark to keep the drill from walking.

d) From memory I believe the stud is approx. 1/2" in diameter or (13mm). You might be able to get by w/ a regular drill, but may need to rent a right angle if there is not enough room.

e) Drill 1/8" hole (remember the drill has to run in reverse w/ a left handed bit.)

f) Drill 1/4' hole

g) The drill 5/16" hole

Run the drill just fast enuff to create a curling chip. This creates the most heat & friction. As you step out in size the torque needed to drill the hole increases exponentially. If you make it to the 5/16" drill then go to an extractor. But read the following before starting w/ the extractor.

I shy away from using extractors from the begining, b/c they normally do not work on smaller bolts (less than 1" in diameter) and tend to brealk and become lodged in the stud you are trying to remove. Once the hole is larger though the extractors success rate goes up.

If you go through all 3 drills and stud is not out. Put the 5/16" bit in the freezer and go find a propane torch. Let the bit chill for about 20 mins. (good time to drink a beer, chill and focus on the task at hand). Insert the cold bit into the stud and use the torch to heat the surrounding block. Block is aluminum, stud is dense steel, so block will expand and stud will contract. Now pull cold bit out, install extractor and remve stud.

This is a trick I have used many times w/ success. Except I use CO2 to cool the bit, (CO2 is from the keg tap, LOL). This was gleaned during my 15yrs as a machinist.

Hope this helps.

dyn>
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Also forgot to add the studs are in the timing belt cover not the block. :) Im gonna try to remove them with it still attached to the block. If I cant then Im gonna have to remove the cover. Ive done it before so it shouldnt take but 30 min to remove it. (been there before when the heads were reworked.. :)
 

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I had a similar problem on my 3, but my problem is locating another stud. Where did you get yours from.

Thanks
Robert
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I got them from Mike at Hilbish Ford. There thread is listed on the main page as Hilbish Ford. I PM'd Mike and he helped me out a great deal...
 

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Curious....how did that stud get broken to begin with? I've always been super careful removing nuts/bolts on engine pieces. I use penetrating oil, a hand-held torch to heat the thing, and patience. As you found out, replacing a broken stud is a pain.

Frankly I wouldn't recommend a beginner attempt such an operation....the odds of failure are great. The use of reverse drills and extractors combined with heat, gives you a chance. As a last resort, you might be able to drill and tap a new hole.....install a slightly larger stud, which might require a larger hole in the mount.

Anyway....this is not an operation I'd like to do in my driveway, particularly if it was my first such attempt to repair a critical broken stud. My 2c......
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Curious....how did that stud get broken to begin with? I've always been super careful removing nuts/bolts on engine pieces. I use penetrating oil, a hand-held torch to heat the thing, and patience. As you found out, replacing a broken stud is a pain.

Frankly I wouldn't recommend a beginner attempt such an operation....the odds of failure are great. The use of reverse drills and extractors combined with heat, gives you a chance. As a last resort, you might be able to drill and tap a new hole.....install a slightly larger stud, which might require a larger hole in the mount.

Anyway....this is not an operation I'd like to do in my driveway, particularly if it was my first such attempt to repair a critical broken stud. My 2c......
It was one of the easiest things Ive done. A ton easier than when I installed a complete roush turbo kit on my 01 zx3. :) But it happened when I was on Hwy 232 in Mid TN. I usually ride the crap out of my bike on that road but this time I took my car. I tried for the 7 min club. Yea that didnt happen. But I believe the stock motor mounts were to mushy under the stress of hard cornering and allowed the engine to move more than it should have and snapped the stud. But its all good now and I havent drove the car any where near as hard as I did that day. (once in a lifetime thing)
 
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