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Discussion Starter #1
So my other issue with the coil packs is fixed, now to go onto my last issue the brakes were replaced about 9 months ago, rotors are still perfectly smooth on both sides, my brakes have started squealing and making a whirling noise only when I brake, i have ceramic brakes and installed those less then 15k miles ago, is it possible for them to already be worn out
 

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Ceramic brakes are just more noisy anyway cuz they're harder than OEM. Squeaking and grinding noises are fairly common complaints... squeaks can usually be solved by some grease or teflon shim on the back of the pad... Griding might be buildup of brake dust btwn the pads and rotors.
If you're really concerned, take it back to where you had it done and ask them to check everything. While they have the stuff apart they can clean up the pads and ensure they add grease/shim to the backs if it's not already there.
Personally I don't bother with ceramics. Regular pads are fine for a Focus unless you're tracking it.
 

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Many vehicles today come from the factory with ceramic brakes this includes Ford products. This has been the norm for well over a decade if not more.

Ceramic pads are actually not the best for the track. They are for long life and low dust. Ceramic brakes are quiet much quieter than semi-metallic.
But if you don't properly clean and lube the brakes are doomed to make noise.

Not trying to be a jerk at all.






Sent from my LG-LS997 using Tapatalk
 

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Right. Well, I suppose brakes are like so many other aspects of vehicles, in that everyone seems to have a different take. Its been my experience that ceramics for a daily are noisier. And there's no shortage of complaints online about noisy ceramics too.
Whatever the case, we also don't know exactly what type or quality the OP purchased. RockAuto has ceramics for the Focus ranging from $13 a front set to $50 a front set. If they were on the cheaper end of that price range I wouldn't be surprised with increased noise no matter what they're made of.
Original advice still applies. If he's that concerned, he should have them looked at to be sure he doesn't have a sticky caliper or something that wore them down prematurely; and have them cleaned/greased/shimmed while they're apart.
 

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If you remove the right angle contact point at the leading edge of the pad or shoe with a deep angle any noise pretty much goes away. No need for any shims or gunk on back of parts.

In this thread we might get somewhere if somebody was smart enough to figure out which end of car is making the noise and whether disc or drum there.

If that's not too hard.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Right. Well, I suppose brakes are like so many other aspects of vehicles, in that everyone seems to have a different take. Its been my experience that ceramics for a daily are noisier. And there's no shortage of complaints online about noisy ceramics too.
Whatever the case, we also don't know exactly what type or quality the OP purchased. RockAuto has ceramics for the Focus ranging from $13 a front set to $50 a front set. If they were on the cheaper end of that price range I wouldn't be surprised with increased noise no matter what they're made of.
Original advice still applies. If he's that concerned, he should have them looked at to be sure he doesn't have a sticky caliper or something that wore them down prematurely; and have them cleaned/greased/shimmed while they're apart.
they are Duralast Gold 45$ for the set
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Ceramic brakes are just more noisy anyway cuz they're harder than OEM. Squeaking and grinding noises are fairly common complaints... squeaks can usually be solved by some grease or teflon shim on the back of the pad... Griding might be buildup of brake dust btwn the pads and rotors.
If you're really concerned, take it back to where you had it done and ask them to check everything. While they have the stuff apart they can clean up the pads and ensure they add grease/shim to the backs if it's not already there.
Personally I don't bother with ceramics. Regular pads are fine for a Focus unless you're tracking it.
We did the brakes ourselves well a mechanic friend of mine did
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Right. Well, I suppose brakes are like so many other aspects of vehicles, in that everyone seems to have a different take. Its been my experience that ceramics for a daily are noisier. And there's no shortage of complaints online about noisy ceramics too.
Whatever the case, we also don't know exactly what type or quality the OP purchased. RockAuto has ceramics for the Focus ranging from $13 a front set to $50 a front set. If they were on the cheaper end of that price range I wouldn't be surprised with increased noise no matter what they're made of.
Original advice still applies. If he's that concerned, he should have them looked at to be sure he doesn't have a sticky caliper or something that wore them down prematurely; and have them cleaned/greased/shimmed while they're apart.
I have an appointment for a brake inspection first thing in the morning
 

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they are Duralast Gold 45$ for the set
I stick with Motorcraft for the Focus, but I've used Dura Gold on a minivan. They should not make noise, and I highly doubt they're worn out at 15K. The heavy van went 50K+ on a set. Yours need to be inspected.

We did the brakes ourselves well a mechanic friend of mine did
There you go. ^^^
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I stick with Motorcraft for the Focus, but I've used Dura Gold on a minivan. They should not make noise, and I highly doubt they're worn out at 15K. The heavy van went 50K+ on a set. Yours need to be inspected.


There you go. ^^^
What do you mean there you go, he’s done many brakes for m in the past never had an issue Until this set but I do have an inspection tomorrow on them and I’ll see what they say
 

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What do you mean there you go, he’s done many brakes for m in the past never had an issue Until this set but I do have an inspection tomorrow on them and I’ll see what they say
My point was, if your mech buddy did your brakes, he should inspect them for you.
 

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If this last set of pads was a xheap crap one that had no relief angle ground on the ends then they will tend to make noise. The sign of cheaper pads.

An inspection will not pick that up unless mech knows what to look for, the calipers likely need to come back off to see it. If the relief was there but shallow to wear off again it needs to be put back on to shut the noise up.
 

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And now, playing Devil's advocate; sometimes you simply get a set of defective brake pads with a 'hard spot' within the brake pad/lining that doesn't show up for a while, and then it gets loud as hell and may feel grabby on one wheel or maybe even locking it up during moderate braking. Usually there will be some scoring on rotor where the hard spot is located if you've been driving on it for a while.
 

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I myself would look at any sudden grabbiness as leaked brake fluid usually as the cause. Even more locking up out of the blue. It doesn't have to be an amount you can see soaked in the pad.

I'd have trouble accepting a 'hard spot' in a pad, they are simply too soft. You can commonly dig out the material with a knife. I file them flat when needed to get pad back right. Sometimes to make up for uneven wear and sometimes to remove the outer surface when they ran too hot.

If your roadside dirt has some aluminum oxide in it (most does to some small extent) that alone can make noise suddenly out of the blue.

I for one do not throw pads or shoes away because they are 'bad', I instead looked for ways to recover them to continue to use them and the vast majority of the time they work out fine doing that. Only worn out I dump them, you can recover ones thoroughly soaked in brake fluid, I've done it. Same if oil or grease gets on them.

But then I wash brake rubber parts like M/C pistons and such in petroleum distillates and they've said you can't do that for 50+ years. You just gotta do it in a way that does not hurt the parts. I've reused old seals and such over that were 40 years old, some are as good as new if never overheated and will work like such forever. You just have to pay attention. And I virtually NEVER change hard parts like linkages and springs to drums, simply no need and thinking you absolutely must is throwing away money. Yes, if YOU NEED IT but most you never need.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
And now, playing Devil's advocate; sometimes you simply get a set of defective brake pads with a 'hard spot' within the brake pad/lining that doesn't show up for a while, and then it gets loud as hell and may feel grabby on one wheel or maybe even locking it up during moderate braking. Usually there will be some scoring on rotor where the hard spot is located if you've been driving on it for a while.
Yeah there are 2 grooves in my rotor not bad at all tho been there for about 4-5 months I’m at the Ford dealership I bought the car at now getting a free brake inspection I get free inspections here since I bought the car here
 

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Discussion Starter #17
And now, playing Devil's advocate; sometimes you simply get a set of defective brake pads with a 'hard spot' within the brake pad/lining that doesn't show up for a while, and then it gets loud as hell and may feel grabby on one wheel or maybe even locking it up during moderate braking. Usually there will be some scoring on rotor where the hard spot is located if you've been driving on it for a while.
Turns out it’s my back brakes they are down to 3mm even tho they were just done last March, they told me they look like they haven’t been replaced in years
 

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I myself would look at any sudden grabbiness as leaked brake fluid usually as the cause. Even more locking up out of the blue. It doesn't have to be an amount you can see soaked in the pad.

I'd have trouble accepting a 'hard spot' in a pad, they are simply too soft. You can commonly dig out the material with a knife. I file them flat when needed to get pad back right. Sometimes to make up for uneven wear and sometimes to remove the outer surface when they ran too hot.

If your roadside dirt has some aluminum oxide in it (most does to some small extent) that alone can make noise suddenly out of the blue.

I for one do not throw pads or shoes away because they are 'bad', I instead looked for ways to recover them to continue to use them and the vast majority of the time they work out fine doing that. Only worn out I dump them, you can recover ones thoroughly soaked in brake fluid, I've done it. Same if oil or grease gets on them.

But then I wash brake rubber parts like M/C pistons and such in petroleum distillates and they've said you can't do that for 50+ years. You just gotta do it in a way that does not hurt the parts. I've reused old seals and such over that were 40 years old, some are as good as new if never overheated and will work like such forever. You just have to pay attention. And I virtually NEVER change hard parts like linkages and springs to drums, simply no need and thinking you absolutely must is throwing away money. Yes, if YOU NEED IT but most you never need.
Agree with you on pretty much everything U stated, but we are trying to assist based on the very limited information we have concerning the poster's brake noise problem, which he has since updated does have rotor scoring. Admittedly hard spots are much more commonly encountered in a semi-metallic pad, but it's certainly not out of the realm of possibility for any pad, regardless of composition. It could just be as simple as road debris got caught up and stuck and is now scoring the rotor in two spots, but again, we are simply trying to illuminate the possibilities given the limited info we have to work with. Hopefully, the Ford techs won't simply go for the 'normal' and tell the owner they need to replace rotor and pads with the 'Ford' OEM items at a cost beyond comprehension (Firstborn child? Or is it just a leg below the knee now?). Free inspections are great and all, but you do have to realize the business dealer service departments are in is to make $$$, so I am very interested to hear what they find/recommend to resolve the issue.
 

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Turns out it’s my back brakes they are down to 3mm even tho they were just done last March, they told me they look like they haven’t been replaced in years
Did you see the pads? And if they were worn down to the nubs/wear indicators, have you or another driver left the handbrake/emergency brake engaged whilst driving? Rear brake pads generally last waaay longer than fronts which do 75% of the braking, unless you leave the e-brake engaged a bit or have been rallying the car. Glad you found the issue, regardless. :)
 

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Turns out it’s my back brakes they are down to 3mm even tho they were just done last March, they told me they look like they haven’t been replaced in years
well, unless you bought a full set of those Duralast Gold pads and watched as they were installed all around, they may not have gotten installed on the rear. The rears may not have really needed replacing at that time; especially if a 'friend' was doing you a favor, as you mentioned and looked at the condition of rotors/pads at that time,. A good rule of thumb is the rear pads get replaced every other time you swap fronts, or when they hit the wear indicators. I only replace rear pads when I'm changing out rotors pretty much, but that's just the way it's worked out for me. Best of luck to you!
 
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