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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, pretty sure the rotors are warped. I checked the brake shoes when I changed rims to see if they were going, and they are still looking good. The brake pedal, along with the rest of the car, are pulsating when braking, the steering wheel is also vibrating a lot more than it should. So, I called the local ford dealer, and they said I should have the rotors turned before I get them replaced. Quoted me $80 to have both fronts turned. My question to you, is should I have them turned, or replace them? They are the stock rotors, and have 67k on them. And if I am to replace them, is there any benefit from going with drilled/slotted rotors? And if so, what brand? What brand shoes? I would like to get this issue fixed.... before it gets worse.... -Dennis
 

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Well first off, that sounds pretty high for turning rotors. Autozone and the like will probably do it for a lot less. But the thing to remember, when you turn the rotors, your pads will no longer line up smoothly against them, since they've most likely worn unevenly because of the uneven rotors. Some places can even them out, but you're probably better off getting new ones. As for turn or replace ... take them in and have them looked at by a place that can measure them. They'll tell you if they can be turned or not.
 

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Well if you can take them off, you can turn them for 1/2 the quoted price from the dealer. Any good auto parts store could turn them. Being slightly thinner, they'll probably warp sooner, but who knows.

Drilled/slotted rotors will give you nothing on a street car, except noise, and shorter pad life....IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
How hard is it to remove to rotors yourself? Ive never taken them off before. Ive done pads, but no removal of anything.
 

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Well, once you take the caliper off to take the pads off ... the rotor generally comes right off. Its been awhile since I did them on my car, so I can't remember if there was any kind of retaining clip or not, but I don't think there was. Every so often they'll use some kind of cheap disposable clip to hold the rotor on ... its not really there for any mechanical reason, just there to keep the rotors from falling off as the car moves around on the assembly line.
 

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Since you've changed pads, if you remove the caliper holder bracket (two more bolts)......the rotor will come right off unless it's stuck. Hit the edge with a rubber hammer to loosen it. When you put the rotor back on, sand the rust off the hub and the surface of the rotor that touches the hub and the wheel. Then put on a light coating of hi-temp grease to prevent sticking in the future.....obviously don't grease the surface of the rotor that touches the pads.

It's an easy job.....
 

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If your picking up drilled and/or slotted rotors, you've got a few options.

ZXTuner has the cheapest price at $109 a set. However, some people have had problems recieving their items.

Steeda has EBC available for $231

FocusSport has a pair of slotted rotors available for $199.

You have a few options in pads. Steeda stocks EBC pads and FocusSport stocks Hawk.
They come in different performance levels depending on what you plan on doing with them. They run between $70 to $100.
 

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Last time I looked, there is a really nice new slotted rotor on Tire Rack by DBA. They are a little on the pricey side, but look very quality.

Also I would avoid anything that's drilled as those seem to be more prone to cracking. Slotted/dimpled and slotted don't give as much trouble.
 

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First, Rotors do no WARP! there is build up of pad material on the rotor surface, or the brakes make contact un evenly and wear the rotor differently.

Second, Turning your rotors will make them thinner, thus replacing the pads to make evenly with them now, they will heat up faster, and wear quicker. I find this annoying and just do a full brake job with new rotors and pads. My typical replacement is Autozone Blanks and Hawk HPS pads.

Third, There is no benefit on drilled or slotted rotors, or a combo of both. That reduces the braking surface area. People claim they have better braking power with them, but it is a combination of different rotor material, and better pads.

Edit #3: Drilled and slotted were good for older type brake pads that released gases when used, and would have no where to escape. Now the pads are gas free, and thus do not need anywhere to escape.

Fourth, I would highly recommend getting Autozone blanks, Hawk HP or HPS pads to go with them. If you need the Drums serviced, I would suggest getting the ones with the bearing already in them, and then take off the larger nut and doing a whole drum setup, with wheel bearing. It will save you the time and effort of doing it again when you have a bearing blow out on you from wiggling it on and off the spindle.

Hope this information helps,

~Kevin
 

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Huh ^^^ Rotors do warp. This can be confirmed with a dial gauge with the rotor still on the car. Or you can put it in a brake lathe and check it. I've turned hundreds of rotors, and can confirm some were warped >.020.

On some cars you can start to feel a warp of only .002. If you have a minor warp like this, the lathe might only have to remove .005 or so to get it straight. This is not enough metal removal to affect anything. Turning rotors is a standard part of a brake pad replacement at many places, although it isn't really necessary unless there is some warp.
 

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Huh ^^^ Rotors do warp. This can be confirmed with a dial gauge with the rotor still on the car. Or you can put it in a brake lathe and check it. I've turned hundreds of rotors, and can confirm some were warped >.020.

On some cars you can start to feel a warp of only .002. If you have a minor warp like this, the lathe might only have to remove .005 or so to get it straight. This is not enough metal removal to affect anything. Turning rotors is a standard part of a brake pad replacement at many places, although it isn't really necessary unless there is some warp.

THEY DO NOT WARP!

They have excess build up of material on them, or the pad causes them to wear wrong. Warping would consist of heating the metal up enough for it to mold differently.

Again THEY DO NOT WARP!
 

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No sense in arguing, but wear at the point of pad contact on each side of the rotor, is different from a heat warp. If you spin the rotor in a lathe, you can actually see the warp, as the whole rotor will go in/out as it's spinning. Contact wear from a pad usually does not visually show up like this.

Call it what you want....but turning can fix the problem.
 

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THEY DO NOT WARP!

They have excess build up of material on them, or the pad causes them to wear wrong. Warping would consist of heating the metal up enough for it to mold differently.

Again THEY DO NOT WARP!

I have to disagree, rotors do warp but not to the degree or number people think they do. It's in reality a very low percentage. Most problems associated with or referred to as warped rotors are really just poor/inconsistent metallurgy or poor initial machining. After all, rotors and drums are just cast iron, one of the lower grades of metal but having lots of mass. Rotors and drums that have these metallurgical inconsistencies will bed unevenly and will create the pulsating that most people associate as warping. Furthermore, a rotor with excess run out is rarely if ever warped, it's just badly machined.

Warping occurs when the rotor is subjected to extreme temperatures and does not cool evenly. This causes the metal to expand or contract unevenly. Real warping will also change the metallurgical structure and can result in even poorer bedding characteristics. Even if it can be machined or turned back to acceptable tolerances, a truly warped rotor must be replaced and not reused.

A rotor that has excessive run-out as a result of poor manufacturing tolerances can be turned up to the allowable minimums. If the turned rotor is going to be subjected to heavy use (towing or motorsports for example) its probably best to replace it. For normal everyday street use a turned rotor should be just fine.
 

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can you read? If so, begin by devouring that article. :)
 

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hmm...i would just buy some new ones...especially since they quoted you at 80.00. That is just rediculas!
 

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Correction from info from my Friend who works at Bosch who does testing with rotors.

You can warp a rotor, if you have a mis torqued wheel which will allow the hat on your rotor to warp, which will cause the brake surface to flower.

what 99.9% of people see is pad material transfer, which can be corrected by a few aggressive stops in a parking lot.

Also he said that anyone who turns a rotor now a days is stupid, because they are produced with such a little tolerance that it will be fruitless to spend the money on it, and also because of a lot of the crap metal coming from China that should never be replaced.

Rotor warping would be caused due to prolonged abuse on anything but dedicated race cars seeing high speeds over a prolonged period of time which is not anything that a Focus will see.

This is more reason when a tire shop does your wheels to have them use a Torque wrench and not an impact gun to allow even pressure on the rotor, and not allow it to distort. Proper maintenance of your vehicle will prevent this type of warping from happening.
 

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I agree that incorrect torquing, especially on what are referred to as loose rotors (the kind that simply slide on and off over the lug nuts), can distort the rotor. This, on occasion, can be corrected by re-torquing the lug nuts without permanent damage to the rotor occurring.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
So uh, its getting worse. I had the tires balanced today, and after the balance, its gotten a lot worse. The whole car is vibrating, and pretty badly. The steering wheel is shaking, to the point where my whole body is vibrating because of it. And it worsens when braking. I tried the tip of braking hard a few times, and that didnt help or worsen the situation. What should I do.....


I was quoted 80 to turn the rotors, from the dealer, and from Les Schwab. Les Schwab quoted me $400 to put on new rotors, calipers, brake pads, and labor. Is it really a good option to just turn them? I would think that would just give a temp solution.... But I dont know...


Its very annoying... [scream]


Also, the back of my car squeaks. Its comming from the rear suspension I know that much, it does it even if i just run over a rock. Its done this pretty much since we bought the car, and Ive never found an answer to what it could be. That is annoying as well.... and its not a quiet squeak, its pretty loud.
 

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Who did the tire balance? If it was les schwab, I can garantee they torqued the lugs down to about 200 ft-lbs and did it in a circle. They are terrible about that. Go out and redo all the lugs as soon as you can.

I wouldnt let them change the tires on my wheel barrow, let alone my car. The only guys there that know anything are the guys doing the alignments, and even then you get lucky if your guy has been doing it for more than 2 years.
 
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