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I think everyone who owns a focus will agree that it sits too high. One of the most popular modifications for the focus is lowering it. In this topic I will go into some detail about the different kinds of lowering available for our cars.

Here are some of the more popular and well known coil spring sets you will find on the market.
Front Rear
Eibach Pro kit 1.4 1.5
Eibach Sportline 2.0 2.2
H&R 1.5 1.5
Progress 1.8 1.8
Apex 1.6 2.0
Ford Racing by KW 1.6 1.6
BAT sport 35mm 35mm
BAT sport 50mm 50mm
Hitec FK 35mm 40mm
Hitec FK 60mm 40mm


When shopping for a drop for your car there are a few things to take into consideration. First, what’s the reason for the drop? Appearance, handling or both? Here is some information you should know about lowering your car.

Aftermarket springs do several things, most noticeably is lowering the vehicles center of gravity. This has several benefits, it reduces squat on acceleration, nose dives under heavy braking and body roll in cornering.

It is important to know what kind of spring you are putting on your car when you go suspension shopping.

Progressive rate springs are designed to become stiffer as they are compressed allowing a smooth transition between straight line comfort and high performance cornering.

Many of the cheaper springs available are not specially tested and trued by quality manufacturers. These springs sit lower than stock but do not have superior dampening ability and often provide a harsh ride.

Remember also that lowering your cars ride height adds negative camber angle to the front suspension. This helps make for better handling also, as long as the vehicle isn’t lowered more than 2” or 50mm.

The stock focus doesn’t have adjustments to compensate for large changes in camber. So premature tire wear can result if going over 2”.

Always get an alignment done after installing suspension parts.

***I RECOMMEND REPLACING YOUR STOCK DAMPERS WHEN USING ANY KIND OF AFTERMARKET COIL SPRING KIT***

If you have a question about one of these parts or another related suspension part, feel free to PM me or e-mail me at [email protected]
 

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take a look at FK... i have a set of the 60/40 lowering springs and they work great...$190 after shipping
 

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I just ordered the Eibach pro kit 1.4 1.5 inch drop. Should I wait till I get new dampers before I put them on? Or can I ride on the stock ones for a while till I can save up to get new dampers? Also, is a camber kit necessary, since like you said, it's not over a 2" drop.
 

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If I buy a lowering kit, where can I get it installed? I really don't have the time/space/tools/skills to do the work. What kind of shop should I look for?

Thanks,

J-
 

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Sorry, I could have told you where to go if you were in NoVA......try going to a Midas, they do suspensions too......you should be able to talk the mechanic into putting an aftermarket suspension easy...........

Peace...................
 

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Does anyone here have direct expirence with the Eibach Sportline vs Eibach Pro kits? focaltech said that there would be tire wear with over a 2in drop and Eibach appears to be the only major manufacturer doing it, so i was just curious if any owners noticed this type of thing.
 

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Is there any benifit to purchasing dampers without lowering the foci?
 

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Has anyone looked at what happens to roll center geometry, bump steer, and possible suspension travel issues after lowering the Focus?

I agree a lower CG is always better, but more often than not roll geometry errors are induced by lower a car that counter the positive effect of the low CG with the net result of making the chassis performance worse. Automotive engineers design suspension to have the fewest geometry errors at the stock ride height. I'm sure there's some variability here, but most suspensions get sloppier about controlling wheel attitude as they approach the limits of their travel.

And you certainly don't want to be anywhere near the bump stops. Once you hit those the effective spring rate becomes infinite and everything goes out the window.

Also, with any modern chassis like the Focus, at least a few degrees of static negative camber are required to make the contact patch as large as possible as the suspension de-cambers under full chassis roll. This depends on the type of tire used and how hard the car is cornered. A sticky radial ply DOT race tire, even though its sidewalls tend to be very stiff, usually needs more neg camber than, say, a snow tire. In the case of the snow tires, there's not enough grip to decamber the suspension very much and so it doesn't need much negative camber to maintain the maximum contact patch. That's why rally cars don't run much, if any, negative camber.

Of course, there's no substitute for lap times. If the lap times are lower, then you can't argue with that.
 

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Oh, yes, with the SVT Focus I believe there certainly is benefit to uprating the damping. The SVT is underdamped. The car isn't very sharp transitionally. Once the chassis rolls into a cornering attitude the feel of car is VERY good. I'm sure Ford choose the damping rates they did to maintain comfort.

Dampers would help to improve wheel/chassis control, which is where I think the car needs work out of the box. Uprated damping would improved the transitional character of the car as well as the acceleration and braking.

If you're serious driver or use the car for autocross or road racing, the dampers should be adjustable. And unless you're very serious the dampers don't have to be adjustable for bump. While you almost can't get enough rebound damping, you can have too much bump damping. It's like having anti-roll bars that are too large.

The other thing the car needs is larger anti-roll bars both back and front. I'm sure they choose the rear bar size to make the car less threatening of oversteer to accomodate the preferences of most drivers; and to avoid lawsuits. Some thing just a bit bigger in front, and something much bigger in the back would help. The rear bar should be adjustable.

Racing tires, better dampers, and bigger anti-roll bars, at least a bigger one the back, would be the first easy things to do to get the car working well with the minimum cost and effort. I suspect the car would be transformed from stock. From there a limited slip diff would be the next step but this is a bit pricey.
 

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Hey focal, I was checking out the Progress springs on a site and noticed that they have a corrective camber kit for sale. It doesn't give a description, so I was wondering if this would be beneficial to get with the springs and/or what is the purpose?
 
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