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No tensioner on the AC belt... it require a stretch belt install / remove tool. Do not install with force it will damage the belt.

Stretch belt tool is not that expensive. <40$ on amazon.
According to Helms you need both 303-1419 Remover and 303-1252/2 Tool, Stretchy Belt Installer.

Is this for real? [facepalm]

Edit: Maybe the Lisle 59370 will work. There was a comment that said it worked on 2013 Focus.
 

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Discussion Starter #42
Not necessary with the OAT coolant in the Focus, should last at least 5 years if not longer. In this case a leaky water pump is just a leaky water pump, not neglected coolant.
If you have a leak it won't be long it turn into a frotty coolant. Mine was oxided from the air contact.

If the system is in top shape 5 year doable... but don't re-use the coolant if you drain to chage something!
 

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If you have a leak it won't be long it turn into a frotty coolant. Mine was oxided from the air contact.

If the system is in top shape 5 year doable... but don't re-use the coolant if you drain to chage something!
It has that new Chrysler purple OTA coolant in it now, only one week old, the type without 2-EHA in that is supposed to last for 10 years. The water pump leak (still assuming, pressure tester isn't here yet) is less than a cup a day, only does so under pressure. It will get re-filled with the same stuff this weekend if all goes well. Supposed to be nearly 100 degrees this weekend, we'll see if I can do the whole job in the morning before it gets hellish.
 

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According to Helms you need both 303-1419 Remover and 303-1252/2 Tool, Stretchy Belt Installer.

Is this for real? [facepalm]

Edit: Maybe the Lisle 59370 will work. There was a comment that said it worked on 2013 Focus.
lol, instead of buying a tool just slip it on.

Have you ever used a tire change machine? Slip it on with a sturdy piece of plastic while rotating the crank.

 

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So my $67 Stant pressure tester with $60 Stant 12043 Ford adapter setup proved indeed it was the water pump leaking. Nice to be certain, and good to have a useful tool that I probably should have bought years ago. I used the OTC 7425 Stretch Belt Service Set to install the belt. Tried the remover, but seemed like a PITA so I just cut the AC belt off. You have to unbolt the passenger engine mount and jack up the engine to get the pump to clear the chassis. Definitely one of the more involved water pump replacment jobs I've done.

Put a lot of effort into cleaning and degreasing the engine bay and pulleys. That coolant leak made a huge mess! Looks great under the hood now, without coolant getting everywhere. Who would have known such a small leak could slime everything! Hopefully good for 100K, I don't think 75K miles from the first water pump is typical. Put a new tensioner and both belts on also. Hopefully no more major problems for a while.
 

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When black plastic radiator tanks turn brown on the exterior you can bet a crack will soon follow.
Unfortunately plastic radiators don't always last that long, and can be unpredictable. I still have the original radiator. It looks like a royal PITA to change, either disassembling from the bumper to the radiator, or evacuating and removing the AC.

I'll probably get to experience this fun a few years down the road.
 

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Discussion Starter #48
Unfortunately plastic radiators don't always last that long, and can be unpredictable. I still have the original radiator. It looks like a royal PITA to change, either disassembling from the bumper to the radiator, or evacuating and removing the AC.

I'll probably get to experience this fun a few years down the road.
I would rather fall into a bottomless pit than doing this PITA radiator change again. If you don't disconnect the AC lines you have to be very careful since you bend them here and there to move the condenser (also thin and easy to damage)out of the way. It was making me nervous.
 

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So it sounds like there is no one best way to remove the radiator. I like option #3 below but I'd hate to damage my condenser.

#1 Follow the Helm Shop Manual and disconnect the A/C Condenser and pull everything out the bottom as an assembly and disassemble it that way
#2 Follow the Mishimoto aluminum radiator instructions for a Focus ST and remove the Front Bumper Cover, lights, air ducting, active grill shutters, etc
#3 Somehow finagle it from the bottom without disconnecting the A/C or ruining the Condenser. The Haynes manual also says this is possible, but highly recommends removing the front bumper cover for access.

Mine is leaking right above the drain also. I'm trying to build a parts list to buy for replacement. Did everyone replace the upper and lower seals (foam pieces)? Any other parts that people found needed replacing once they were in there?
 

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Well, I got my new one in last night.

It wasn't the easiest thing. I left the bumper cover in place, but did remove the headlights. I don't see how removing the bumper cover would help unless you have active grill shutters and even removing them wouldn't gain much benefit. I had plenty of access to reach everything with the headlights removed. The difficult part is the way the radiator and condenser are clipped together then inserted. They just didn't want to come apart without me being extremely worried that the condenser lines would bend too much and develop leaks. The radiator was never meant to be removed by itself.

If I were to do it again, I'd take it to a shop and have them evacuate my refrigerant. Then i'd drive home and pull them both down together and probably put a new condenser in as well (rocks usually have caused me to replace condensers eventually anyway sometime between 150k-250k miles). You could take it back to a shop for refilling, or I'd take the excuse to buy a nice set of gauges and vacuum pump!
 

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I replaced my radiator on my 2012 last year at about 175k miles. I ended up removing the bumper, grill shutters (mine looked like my house's horizontal blinds after my cat tried to catch a flying insect), and headlights. I suspended the condenser with some zip ties. It wasn't too bad of a job, but I was working slowly and patiently. About 5 hours, if I recall correctly.
 

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I did some research before attempting this, and saw how the rad+condenser clipped together. Maybe took 3 hours pulling it from the bottom. No ac issues afterwards, so I guess I did good.
 
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