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Discussion Starter #1
Hi...

I am new to the Focus and the Forum.
I just brought a second hand Australian Focus 2011 Turbo Diesel Titanium White Sedan. So far very impressed, had a lot of features that I just wasn't expecting for a small Ford and drives very nicely.

I have read about the new Focus having Active City Stop / Active Brake Assist. How do I find out if my 2011 model had this feature? I only just found it had active park assist, which was very daunting at first but it works great and is a real neat little feature.

Any help would be appreciated. Obviously it's not something I can just try in the car, on the assumption that it may not have the feature of city stop / active brake assist.

Thanks...
 

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I'll move this to the MkIII section to see if any Aussie/Euro members have any info..
 

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Hi...

I am new to the Focus and the Forum.
I just brought a second hand Australian Focus 2011 Turbo Diesel Titanium White Sedan. So far very impressed, had a lot of features that I just wasn't expecting for a small Ford and drives very nicely.

I have read about the new Focus having Active City Stop / Active Brake Assist. How do I find out if my 2011 model had this feature? I only just found it had active park assist, which was very daunting at first but it works great and is a real neat little feature.

Any help would be appreciated. Obviously it's not something I can just try in the car, on the assumption that it may not have the feature of city stop / active brake assist.

Thanks...
Go to settings, and under Driver Assist, this is the section in your menu which shows features such as Traction control ESC, BLIS, City Stop, Forward Alert, Driver Alert, Hill Start Assist, Tire deflation detection, Traffic signs, Lane Departure.
If City Stop is in your menu the feature defaults to on, unless you disable the feature.




Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Absolutely does help - thank you. No, nothing there except Traction Control (ECS) ON/OFF.

Really appreciate your help.
 

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Go to settings, and under Driver Assist, this is the section in your menu which shows features such as Traction control ESC, BLIS, City Stop, Forward Alert, Driver Alert, Hill Start Assist, Tire deflation detection, Traffic signs, Lane Departure.
If City Stop is in your menu the feature defaults to on, unless you disable the feature.




Hope this helps.

Is it me or the Euro focus is more like a Mercedes in North America ? loll
 

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Hard to know how much they'd charge for a top trim Euro model in the USA because they have not and will not offer it in the USA. I suspect the USA would not pay the kind of money they would charge for one if they did offer it and I also think Ford would not want that much tech overlap with there higher models.

Face it, the Focus is only one step up from the lowest model Ford sells and they want customers that want that level of tech to buy the higher model with the higher price.


Brian
 

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The gap keeps narrowing as small cars become more popular.

Top level of each generation has been fancier in the U.S. than the prev. one.
 

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Ford want customers that want that level of tech to buy the higher model with the higher price.
Brian
Why?

Why does Ford think a Focus consumer that wants the size of a Focus car with the features only available in the next size up (Fusion) will settle for a unwanted larger car because of some features Ford refuses to offer on the Focus?

If those features are sold throughout the lineup, then those features are much cheaper to offer to the end consumer.

Also why should a well to do consumer whom desires the Focus over larger vehicles or competitors offerings has to lower their expectations regarding features offered on the Focus in other markets?

Active City Stop feature would cost a couple hundred US$.
A bundled package including City Stop, Lane Assist, BLIS, and the others could probably be priced under US$900.00.

Not deal breaking stuff.

Seems to me Ford North America is willing to let the competition lead the way with some of these features on their C segment offerings, which is odd as when Ford launched the MK3 Focus, they did with the goal to lead, which at the time they were, but for some reason have changed their priorities with the Focus.
 

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Keep in mind also, federal safety regulations are different in the EU than they are in NA. what is required in the eu is optional at best. I mean, why can't I get a focus is NA with rear fogs? Couldn't possibly be more than $150 per car for wiring, lights, switch and programming, yet, it's not mandatory so it's not included. Some options are present, but arent selectable, IE: Hill start. My '12 has it, it's not selectable tho.

I've long wondered what the purpose of city stop would be... I get how the system functions, but how could it tell the difference between rush hour stop-n-go, and actually being stopped at a light. Not to mention, imagine the number of complaints dealerships would get that would go like this "my car is broken! I stopped at this red light and the engine just DIED! fortunately, I got it restarted, but it happened again and again...." blah blah blah etc etc...
 

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Keep in mind also, federal safety regulations are different in the EU than they are in NA. what is required in the eu is optional at best.

I've long wondered what the purpose of city stop would be... I get how the system functions, but how could it tell the difference between rush hour stop-n-go, and actually being stopped at a light. Not to mention, imagine the number of complaints dealerships would get that would go like this "my car is broken! I stopped at this red light and the engine just DIED! fortunately, I got it restarted, but it happened again and again...." blah blah blah etc etc...
Please explain "what safety regs in the EU are optional at best.

I think you are confusing Auto Stop/Start with Active City Stop.[poke]
 

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Please explain "what safety regs in the EU are optional at best."
*sigh* that was a brain-fart, my apologies. It should have been "what safety regs are required in the eu are optional at best in NA."

Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't auto start/stop the same functionality as active city stop, just with different parameters to engage it?
 

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I don't think so Brian, I think the City Stop is a version of active braking to help avoid a crunch at lower speeds.
 

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Auto/Stop start
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CnrhTDjHLdY

Active City Stop
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sgGQ_5Q70rE
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qmftqk5fw70

New info pertaining to the 2015 Focus
*Ford also has improved its Active City Stop collision avoidance system, which uses sensors at
the front of the vehicle to look for stationary objects in the road ahead and pre-charges the
brakes if the vehicle is approaching an object too quickly. If the driver still does not respond the
system reduces engine torque and automatically applies the brakes to reduce the impact of
collisions. Active City Stop now operates for the new Focus at speeds of up to 50 km/h
(31 mph), increased from 30 km/h (19 mph).
In the case of moving objects Active Braking works in a similar way to Active City Stop but with
a vehicle detection range of between 8 km/h (5 mph) and 180 km/h (112 mph). It supports
drivers at higher speeds, for example on the motorway, by issuing warnings and applying
braking as required.
Existing Adaptive Cruise Control technology enables Focus drivers to maintain a set distance
from the vehicle ahead, even when that vehicle is travelling more slowly than the cruise speed.
For occasions when Adaptive Cruise Control is not active, Ford is now introducing to Europe
Distance Indication, which enables drivers to set a preferred distance they would like to maintain
with the vehicle ahead. Should the driver get any closer, the system issues a three-stage
dashboard display warning – from grey to yellow to red.*
 

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Why?

Why does Ford think a Focus consumer that wants the size of a Focus car with the features only available in the next size up (Fusion) will settle for a unwanted larger car because of some features Ford refuses to offer on the Focus?

If those features are sold throughout the lineup, then those features are much cheaper to offer to the end consumer.

Also why should a well to do consumer whom desires the Focus over larger vehicles or competitors offerings has to lower their expectations regarding features offered on the Focus in other markets?

Active City Stop feature would cost a couple hundred US$.
A bundled package including City Stop, Lane Assist, BLIS, and the others could probably be priced under US$900.00.

Not deal breaking stuff.

Seems to me Ford North America is willing to let the competition lead the way with some of these features on their C segment offerings, which is odd as when Ford launched the MK3 Focus, they did with the goal to lead, which at the time they were, but for some reason have changed their priorities with the Focus.
I'm not in disagreement with you and only pointing out the business mindset at play. Although the cost for feature such as active city stop with adaptive cruise control might be less than $1K I think most car makers that sell in the USA market don't think enough buyers of low end models like the Focus would she'll out that kind of money for that tech. I would but perhaps not enough others.

The USA doesn't have the same tendency for older folks to buy a car like the Focus as a family car and instead tend more towards the SUV and mini van. Again, my buying tendency is more in line with how European buyers buy so I'm not typical. Not saying there aren't any in the USA that buy like Europeans as I'm an example of just such a buyer.

The other thing is that the USA is VERY litigious and you can bet the pricing in the USA would be significantly effected by the fact that the car buyers WILL sue when they have an accident. There are more lawyers in the USA than the total population of some nations.


Brian
 

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It's not lawyers, it's markets. Ford picks and chooses so they don't have to hear it from the auto mags ("$36,000 for a FOCUS??"). A loaded Titanium is already getting close to $30k. People don't want to spend premium cash for a compact in this country (yes, I know, we do, but most people don't), whereas, like you said, this is a family car across the pond.

Keep in mind that the Focus has features that no other competitor had when it debuted—like Active Park Assist (I don't consider the Prius a competitor, and the Prius has always been a tech leader for nonluxury cars). New tech comes with a new model or at least a refresh. Mazda was the first to put a City Stop feature in a mainstream nonluxury model in the US, I think, with Smart City Brake Support in the CX-5. The Mk3 Focus had already debuted by then, so let's just be glad we got it with the refresh ;)
 

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I would actually argue that people will pay premium cash for a compact, but they don't yet feel that Ford is a "premium" brand. They believe that VW, Honda and the like are the only premium brands available.
I would also say that it's not just markets, and it's not just lawyers... It's also law makers, lobbyists who influence laws that are made and finally (and most importantly) public opinion. I would personally LOVE to have a focus "estate" or wagon variant, but Ford believes they won't sell, and truthfully, they might not, as public opinion (however misinformed it might be) says that SUV's are always the better choice than a van or wagon. Vans such as the Grand caravan, Ford free star, and Chevy Uplander served their role well, but people started to believe the BS about soccer-mom vehicles and whipped-hubby drivers and so the market for vans tanked and automakers stopped making and selling them. Why is the Nissan GTR finally available in North America? was it laws that changed? Nope... Public opinion changed, and Nissan, knowing it would be a niche car anyways, said why not see if we can sell some over there since the public seems to be wanting them... And guess what? It sold like hotcakes... Now, if Father Ford could influence public opinion (or all automakers got together) and make wagons cool and fun (like some of the wagon variants available in the EU) fun wagons might just start being sold here.

It's like why we don't get very many diesel variants in North America. You ask people what they think when they hear the word diesel, and most will say things like "noisy" or "smelly" or "ugly" or stuff like that... But the reality is that the only reason North America really only see's diesels in trucks and the odd MR or VW, is because public opinion remains unchanged about diesels, even though the tech has MASSIVELY improved and now diesels are the goto engine of choice in most European markets as they are fuel efficient, quiet, reliable and powerful.
But I digress... Change public opinion if you want a better optioned car, that's what will make the biggest difference.
 

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Public opinion is hugely important to the makeup of the market, for sure. I don't doubt that. Americans don't buy wagons or minivans, so we mostly don't get them. The ones we do get don't get sold, not that much anyway, but to those who really want them: "active lifestyle" Volvo wagon types, and families that don't suffer for fashion.

Diesels suffer from a huge perception problem partially because older diesels were clattery and dirty, but also in no small part thanks to the terrible, half-baked Cadillac V8 from around 1980, which was based on the gas engine and not properly beefed to handle compression ignition. Today, although Americans (especially younger ones) are starting to forget about that stuff, and although diesels are cleaner than ever, the diesel engine has trouble getting a foothold in the market because, unlike in Europe, diesel fuel is a lot pricier here than gasoline is. That seriously tempers the advantages of higher fuel economy; coupled with the higher price of a diesel engine, it's not really worth it for most.

It's the same thing for full-featured small cars, as I mentioned before—C-segment hatchbacks like the Focus are "family cars" in Europe, like crossovers are here. Europeans will pay a premium for a nice C-seg hatch in Europe because a car any larger would be impractical. America doesn't have the same kind of space constraints, and we pay plenty for our big CUVs.

It's the idea that lawyers and the "litigious society" contribute to the American automotive market that I find, in a word, silly—at least, it's really silly to cite that as the reason that we have fewer safety features than the Europeans. The American auto market has higher safety standards than any European market I know of—that's the reason small-production cars overseas often don't make it here, it costs millions to "federalize" a car, i.e., to make it meet American safety standards. US law has required for 15 years that every new car sold in the US have driver and passenger airbags; European law has no such requirement as far as I know. US law also mandates, since MY2012, vehicle stability control.

The reason our Focus doesn't have all the fancy stuff from the Euro market is simply that not enough people would buy them so equipped. Already, the majority of the other Focuses I see on the road are SE models; I'll see a Titanium only occasionally. (It's a miracle that Ford put the 5mt in the Titanium as a no-cost option and an even bigger miracle that I found one so equipped just across the river!) People simply don't buy expensive C-segment cars in this country.

(I don't know how the market is in Canada, but Honda isn't a premium brand here, certainly not in the C-segment, anyway, with the current Civic. VW is sort of a "half-semi-premium" brand, or at least has been—it remains true with the Golf, but the Jetta has been pushed really far downmarket as of late.)

But all of these safety systems are available on other cars in America. Most of those cars are in higher market segments: the Volvo XC60, a "near-luxury" midsize crossover, is rife with cool safety stuff, as is the Mercedes S-class (but of course it is, right?). You'll find a tech goodie here or there in the C-segment—BSM is becoming commonplace, the Focus can park itself, the Dart has rear cross traffic detection, the Elantra has heated rear seats, the Mazda CX-5 has city braking and adaptive (swivel) headlights—but if you want everything, you have to move upmarket... or just wait three or four years.

The only safety feature available in Europe and not here that I know of is the variable-intensity rear lighting on the European Mercedes S-class. That doesn't fly here because of NHTSA/DOT lighting requirements, which differ from European lighting requirements (for example, the US requires reflectors and side marker lights, whereas Europe requires amber rear turn signals and side turn signal repeaters). But that's the only one.
 

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I say premium is the sense that honda's are thought of to be well appointed, reliable and a particularly good value, whereas ford/gmc/Dodge are thought of more so as less reliable, less appointed and generally a significantly poorer value.

I could torpedo that from personal experience, but public opinion wont be swayed by just one person.

One thing to mention, some standards in FMVSS 108 haven't been updated since the 80's, and so favour outdated technology. Headlights are a good example. The standards set favour sealed-beam halogen optics, when HID and LED optics both offer better lighting performance, maximized installation options and design and finally longevity. So why does there need to be a maximum lumosity? Because sealed-beam optics are only capable of controlling light output below a certain level. HID's and LED's, even BMW's new laser-phosphor headlights can control light output much more effectively and a much higher luminous intensity while still preventing dangerous "glare" to oncoming traffic.

Anyways, I digress....
 

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The thing is actually that not only Focus is overlooked in NA it terms of technology features. You wont find Active City Stop nor Auto Start/Stop (except ONLY 1.5l EB Fusion has Auto Start/Stop, why not 2.0l EB?!) on any NA Ford's line-up. What Ford is thinking about? have no bloody idea, but many competitors of Focus class already do offer very neat features.
Where is sign recognition BTW? Signs are more sophisticated and complicated in Europe than in NA, so its not a rocket science to implement it in NA vehicles, but still no such an option...
 
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