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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi guys,
was hoping to get some insight from y'all out there. I just replaced the manifold hose along with the drier/accumulator since I had a pretty significant hole in it.

Pulled a vacuum on the system and it held vacuum pretty good.
Went on to recharge and it seems like it took about 35psi when engine is off.
When I turn the engine on, compressor cycles every 3 seconds and the high and low side pressure goes up but not much.
I have a 19oz can of refrigerant and it seems like it took very little freon. Took like 10 seconds and it showed 35psi. Is that normal?
I am using a manifold to do all the readings.

Anyhow, anyone out there with info about how much psi the ac would need?
I have a 2003 Ford Focus SOHC standard tranny.

The first picture is after I recharged system,
Second one, when the compressor turns,
Third one, after the compressor turned a few times.

Thanks so much
 

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Somehow this was posted in the Hawaii section where it wouldn't get much attention.

Moved to General Tech Chat

Read here for more general info:http://www.focusfanatics.com/forum/showthread.php?t=195638

You don't charge it by putting some in while stopped, running it then rechecking. Add while running will work much better for you.
 

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Thinking what he meant was that it didn't come on until he had at least 25 psi in it.

It can take a while to charge, usually 30 minutes or so for me. Don't rush it by shoving in liquid only with can upside down, you can rupture parts doing that. Watch the pressure go spastic on the gauge and you'll get that real quick.

If nothing seems to be charging then suspect the rubber insert in hose at the fitting, they commonly shred pieces that get clogged in hose valve area and no charging then.

The low side needs to sweep up and down from 25-50 or so and the high around 275 psi but need to look at a temp/pressure chart to zero in on that number.
 

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I don't think that is the sort of gauge that you can have both the high and low side valved in at the same time. I would turn off and disconnect the high side for charging. Otherwise you can do some damage to your system, the gauges, and possibly yourself.

You can't tell pressure on the system until the can is empty.
 

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The gauge set would be worthless if you couldn't separate the two sides. I'm assuming it's built with the joining port coming in from the back, turning either the red or blue knob would seal that yellow tube joiner off. Only way to tell is to look at the manifold porting close. They can locate them knobs anywhere.

And what does this mean?

'You can't tell pressure on the system until the can is empty.'

I've done just the opposite a thousand times. Any gas not used as gas yet stays liquid and cannot be compressed, it simply takes up space but does not affect pressure hardly at all, at least not enough to worry about it. The can being empty could be compressed back into and would affect things slightly more. Wouldn't change the high side anyway since isolated by orifice and compressor.
 

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It can sometimes as amc49 said take a while to get enough in to the system actually cause the compressor to kick in, but once it does it will start to suck the freon in at a faster rate in my experience.
Another thought is the freon can valve has not punctured the can enough for proper flow, might want to check that out as Ive had quite a few cans that took forever (15 minutes) to empty and once i removed the valve off of it the puncture hole in the can was so tiny it was just trickling out almost like a pinhole!

Did you open the valving up on the manifold low side enough to allow the freon to flow in along with the can tap valve?
 

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There you go, several small details in how to fill, any one of which can stop you dead in the water. You can't just shove that stuff in, you gotta be able to think (clearly) about it. I always max puncture the hole and retreat the punch tip max amount to clear the passage there. As well the rubber seal in connector must be in good shape and not blocking the small passage there.

There are multiple things you have to do there in certain order and with some thought or hang it up.
 

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That's your typical Harbor Freight AC gauge I have one myself. It works like a normal AC gauge.

One trick I use is to get a pan of warm water, about 120 degrees or thereabout. Immerse the charge can in the water. The Freon in the can is liquid and must change to a gas to come out of the can. It needs a heat source. air is a poor conductor of heat. As amc said never turn the can upside down.
 

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Hi guys,
....
I have a 19oz can of refrigerant and it seems like it took very little freon. ...
There should be a label on one of the trim pieces that covers your radiator and front grill the lists exactly how much R-134 the system takes. If I remember correctly, my 07 took 23 or 26 oz when I replaced my compressor, condenser and accumulator.
 

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That is only if system is dead empty and the oil exactly correct amount too, often not possible in the real world. Why you use the gauges, they tell you when to stop, the amount of refrigerant is not dead accurate, it can vary from car to car. Better by far to hit the pressures there than simply trying to cram possible excess in there. I haven't been able to get that full stated amount into hardly any car I ever work on but they cool like gangbusters. Go by pressures not amount if they vary. Of course they should be close.
 

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Gauge pressures for Freon are only accurate at a specific temperature and as I'm a lazy bastard and don't bother looking up the chart, the method I use is to use a temperature probe in the output of the dashboard vent, as well as looking for sweating on the pipe coming from the evaporator. Add refrigerant to the system until the compressor stops cycling off and on and stays on, then start watching the temperature from the air coming out of the vent with the system on max. The temp will continue to drop as more refrigerant is added, then it will start to level off - by then the evap pipe should be sweating profusely - at that point the system is full.
 

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Exactly. Only I have the one set of numbers memorized for like 95+ degree day here in Texas. Usually around then when I'm doing it. I too have found charging until clutch just quits at idle works well. I got a probe but never use it, I'll have to pursue that a bit closer.
 
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