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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I found out why the A/C does not work on my newly purchased 00 Focus, one hose rubbed up against the radiator support and has a gaping hole in it.
Is the hose assembly from the compressor to the evap and condensor interchangeable with the SPI and Zetec motors? I am assuming 00-04 would be the same?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Another question, since this system has been open, what needs to be replaced?
 

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Since the system has been open you'll need to replace the dryer and the orfice tube.

Sorry don't know the answer to your first question tho.
 

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Aurelius Pardus
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you will need to replace those components, but I'm wondering which hose it is for sure... compressor to condenser, condenser to accumulator or....what.

but hey rockauto.com has them and they have part numbers where you can check if they are interchangeable
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Its the line that comes off the compressor. It goes off in two directions, accumulator and also the condenser. I looked at AZ site and $80 new, going to try a salvage.
What o-rings should be replaced?
 

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Its the line that comes off the compressor. It goes off in two directions, accumulator and also the condenser. I looked at AZ site and $80 new, going to try a salvage.
What o-rings should be replaced?
You're going to need more than that. Getting an accumulator (what someone called a drier) from the junkyard is not an advisable route. The hose would be fine to get- however- there's a design change in the early Foci AC systems that will require you to get a new hose in order to get the accumulator. I do believe it is the suction line going back to the compressor that you need.

You really should check out RockAuto.com. I've found their AC part prices to be outstanding. Even so, the accumulator and hose will run you about $100-150 together IIRC. I'd get the orifice tube from them because it's only $1. Don't get any fancy O-tubes like VOV or pressure regulating orifice tubes. Those don't work.

The O-rings are the least of your worries- financially speaking- I'm not sure of RA sells an O-ring kit or not because I typically purchase generic O-rings instead of kits. See if there is a kit, and get it if there is. Replace all the O-rings while the system is down. That will save you from spending $$$, and only having it work for a few months before it goes down again from a bad O-ring. You system is more than 10 years old, and now it's been relieved of oil, refrigerant, and has moisture in it.

Read the General AC Troubleshooting and Repair thread, and get your vacuum pump ready. Even if you have someone else charge your system, you should at least rent a vacuum pump and gauges so you can make sure the system is sealed before taking it somewhere for a fill. I would have the pump pull a vacuum on that system for at least 30 mins if not longer since it's had a gaping hole in it. You might also want to flush the condenser with either AC system cleaner ($$$) or denatured alcohol. Simply pour it in, and blow it out with a compressor. Be careful not to get any in your eyes regardless of which one you use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks.
I wasn't planning on getting a used accumulator, just the hose.
What kind of a vacuum pump do I rent? Is this a specialized ac vacuum?
If I understand you correctly, since I will be using a new accumulator, the OEM style hose will not work? I would have to purchase a new hose also? One off a used car would not be correct with a new accumulator?
 

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What kind of a vacuum pump do I rent? Is this a specialized ac vacuum?
Yes it is, and you'll need a set of gauges as well. You should be able to rent these at the local parts store. Just makes sure that the pump has oil in it before you run off with it. You'll need the hoses to monitor the vacuum on the system. You should vacuum it down to -30 psi and leave the pump on there for 30 mins after to insure that all the moisture is removed from the system. Then you close the valves on the gauges, disconnect the pump, connect the "fill hose" you used on the pump back to the stop on the manifold- or shut off it's valve (depends on the design)- and open the gauge valve back up again. Now look at the vacuum on the gauge- it will be slightly less- but that's ok. Walk away for 30-45 mins, check vacuum again. As long as the vacuum is the same as it was- you don't have a leak, and you're ready to recharge. Remember to close the valve again before you disconnect or connect your can through the fill hose. I try to maintain some vacuum on the system- it helps pull the refrigerant/oil into the system. Always add oil first, or a "first charge" oil+refrigerant can. Use pressurized oil cans, and read the back where it tells you how much oil is in the can- typically those have 2 oz of oil, and 1 oz of refrigerant.
If I understand you correctly, since I will be using a new accumulator, the OEM style hose will not work? I would have to purchase a new hose also? One off a used car would not be correct with a new accumulator?
That's correct. You might want to check out the part at your local parts store where you can hold it in your hand so you can see what the difference is. Then check to see if your accumulator has already been changed. The car is so old- you might get lucky that it was already changed out. Then you won't need that hose, and you'll know what hose to look for in a junkyard. Check later model Foci 03-04 Zetecs should have the later design.

If you're not familiar with auto AC, then read that General AC thread stuck at the top of this forum. That's why I wrote it. Be prepared, the first time you do your own AC, you might waste some money, but the learning experience can save you thousands later on down the road. All auto AC's, and all AC's in general work on the same principle and have similar parts. The difference between Ford and GM- for example- is that Ford uses quick connect fittings, and GM uses threaded couplings. Chrysler and Mercedes are the only 2 I know of that use metal gaskets instead of O-rings. Some, like Hondas, use expansion valves instead of orifice tubes. Anyway, well worth the DIY experience in the long run even if it costs you as much as it would cost you to pay someone to do it the first time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm pretty friendly with a local repair shop and will probably have them vacuum down the system, check for leaks, and refill.
I did read your AC guide, very informative. I am sure I could do this on my own, but without having the tools and equipment ready, I think I will let a shop do this as long as costs are reasonable.

As for the parts that need replacing, I can tackle that on my own.
Seeing as how neglected this car was, I am pretty confident no upgrade would have been made to the AC system. Probably going to a pick and pull for some other parts and will see if I can find a newer Zetec hose assembly. Looking at rockauto website, I need to find an 03-04 built after 1/03.
Thanks whynot
 
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