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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I'm a newb when it comes to cars but I can do basic stuff like oil changes and I can swap out my all-season tires for winter ones.

So, I was trying to do that today when I found out my 19mm socket wouldn't fit any of my lug nuts. Turns out when I had my brakes and rotors replaced by my mechanic (or perhaps his apprentice, I don't know), all four lug nuts had been warped.

I went to Lordco and Canadian Tire and both service advisors there had said it's common for this to happen as they aren't built to take that much wear and tear, but with Ford vehicles there is a "tin cap" on the lug nut to make them prettier and thus they tend to warp easier.

Any how, do you guys have any suggestions on where to buy a new set? Both places want at least $6 per lug nut.

Thank you in advance!
 

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I bought the above lugs as well and will be putting them on once I get them in the mail. I prefer ebay, so I bought them there with free shipping for $25. They're solid, no caps so they shouldn't warp as quickly as the OEMs.
 

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The Canada Tire guys were right, Ford used defective lug nuts on the Focus as well as a few other models. There was a class action lawsuit at one point but it was thrown out. I have two Focuses, one I just had the local tire shop replace (maybe $25 for the set of 20?), on the other Focus I used McGard lug nuts (about $65 on Amazon for 20).
 

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My son has had the DP lug nuts on his 13 Focus for the last two years and they are excellent.

I have the McGard lug nuts on my Focus and they are also an excellent, but more expensive, option.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
My son has had the DP lug nuts on his 13 Focus for the last two years and they are excellent.

I have the McGard lug nuts on my Focus and they are also an excellent, but more expensive, option.
Thanks for the reply! I’m a bit cheap so I’ll go with the DP ones.


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They are not defective. Try not hammering them on with a shit socket and an impact gun. I Spent 30+ years at Ford dealerships and if you don't over torque them going on and off with and impact gun they last a very long time. Have owned 3 or 4 with this style.
 

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Discussion Starter #11

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Thank you.
I do wonder if the not compatible designation has to do with the four lug of the 02 if the 12 has a five lug need. They seem to both have 12 X 1.5 w/Conical Seats.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thank you.
I do wonder if the not compatible designation has to do with the four lug of the 02 if the 12 has a five lug need. They seem to both have 12 X 1.5 w/Conical Seats.
Hmmmm you could always refund them hehhee.


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Hello,

I'm a newb when it comes to cars but I can do basic stuff like oil changes and I can swap out my all-season tires for winter ones.

So, I was trying to do that today when I found out my 19mm socket wouldn't fit any of my lug nuts. Turns out when I had my brakes and rotors replaced by my mechanic (or perhaps his apprentice, I don't know), all four lug nuts had been warped.

I went to Lordco and Canadian Tire and both service advisors there had said it's common for this to happen as they aren't built to take that much wear and tear, but with Ford vehicles there is a "tin cap" on the lug nut to make them prettier and thus they tend to warp easier.

Any how, do you guys have any suggestions on where to buy a new set? Both places want at least $6 per lug nut.

Thank you in advance!

Then take a small chisel and a hammer, sit down with your favorite beverage (Arnold Palmer for me) and chip away at the lugs that won't loosen.

Good luck. I did mine a few years ago. No regrets.
 

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When you take your car somewhere to get tires put on or balanced or rotated, the lowest paid guy is going to be the one handling. It's pretty much impossible to legislate how he treats the lug nuts, so I'll agree with others who have called the "hollow, cap type" as being inferior. What would it have cost Ford to have put solid ones on? Even for those of us who are serious DIYers on our cars, probably we end up taking the cars somewhere to get new tires put on.

On my 2014 Escape that I bought about a year ago I ended up getting a set of special reverse-twist, tapering sockets on Ebay for about $30. Think of the screw extractors used for screws/bolts, but transfer the same basic concept to an internal (female) socket. My set has 10 sockets in it. I may never use it again in my life, but it allowed me to remove all of the damaged official Ford lug nuts and replace with a solid steel set from Ebay that cost me around $15 for 20 of them delivered. I've bought similar sets for my Mercury Milan, and older Focus ZTW and both of my sons' MKIII Focuses. For the most part we don't worry about what they do at the tire service centers (or worse yet somewhere like Walmart).

This same topic came up on the Excape forum a few weeks ago, and there was some confusion about Ebay listings that showed certain types of lug nuts to be incompatible. In the end what was figured out is that when the Ebay stuff is showing not compatible, it probably has to do with whether the car has steel wheels and wheel covers OR it has factory alloy wheels. I think it would be accurate to say that BOTH of these wheel types require the conical end on the nuts, but on some with wheel covers there is an additional "ridge" on the lug nut that secures the wheel cover. I probably should post a picture because that clarifies things in a heartbeat. No time to do that right now. But if you have a vehicle with steel wheels and you put that on the hub and then a plastic wheel cover and then put on lug nuts to hold both the wheel and cover on (lug nuts do both jobs), then you need to opt for the rarer and slightly more expensive version lug nuts that do have the extra "journal" that sticks out. All of our vehicles have alloy wheels, and while they are all factory alloys, on ebay it will come up saying that the lug nuts are compatible only with factory wheels. That's not so. What they should say is that the majority of the sets of lug nuts on ebay that come up when you search for Focuses or virtually any Ford product of our vintage is that they are NOT compatible with factory steel wheels with wheel covers that are held on by the lug nuts.

In summary, if you have alloy wheels or you have steel wheels with no covers or steel wheels with covers that secure to the rim by other means than lug nuts, then you can use the cheaper nuts that don't have the additional ridge on them. If you have steel wheels with the factory-type wheel covers that are held on with lug nuts, you'll need the different model with the little ridges on them so they can do two jobs at once. Whew, a lot of detail for a pretty small part.
 

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When you take your car somewhere to get tires put on or balanced or rotated, the lowest paid guy is going to be the one handling. It's pretty much impossible to legislate how he treats the lug nuts, so I'll agree with others who have called the "hollow, cap type" as being inferior. What would it have cost Ford to have put solid ones on? Even for those of us who are serious DIYers on our cars, probably we end up taking the cars somewhere to get new tires put on.

On my 2014 Escape that I bought about a year ago I ended up getting a set of special reverse-twist, tapering sockets on Ebay for about $30. Think of the screw extractors used for screws/bolts, but transfer the same basic concept to an internal (female) socket. My set has 10 sockets in it. I may never use it again in my life, but it allowed me to remove all of the damaged official Ford lug nuts and replace with a solid steel set from Ebay that cost me around $15 for 20 of them delivered. I've bought similar sets for my Mercury Milan, and older Focus ZTW and both of my sons' MKIII Focuses. For the most part we don't worry about what they do at the tire service centers (or worse yet somewhere like Walmart).

This same topic came up on the Excape forum a few weeks ago, and there was some confusion about Ebay listings that showed certain types of lug nuts to be incompatible. In the end what was figured out is that when the Ebay stuff is showing not compatible, it probably has to do with whether the car has steel wheels and wheel covers OR it has factory alloy wheels. I think it would be accurate to say that BOTH of these wheel types require the conical end on the nuts, but on some with wheel covers there is an additional "ridge" on the lug nut that secures the wheel cover. I probably should post a picture because that clarifies things in a heartbeat. No time to do that right now. But if you have a vehicle with steel wheels and you put that on the hub and then a plastic wheel cover and then put on lug nuts to hold both the wheel and cover on (lug nuts do both jobs), then you need to opt for the rarer and slightly more expensive version lug nuts that do have the extra "journal" that sticks out. All of our vehicles have alloy wheels, and while they are all factory alloys, on ebay it will come up saying that the lug nuts are compatible only with factory wheels. That's not so. What they should say is that the majority of the sets of lug nuts on ebay that come up when you search for Focuses or virtually any Ford product of our vintage is that they are NOT compatible with factory steel wheels with wheel covers that are held on by the lug nuts.

In summary, if you have alloy wheels or you have steel wheels with no covers or steel wheels with covers that secure to the rim by other means than lug nuts, then you can use the cheaper nuts that don't have the additional ridge on them. If you have steel wheels with the factory-type wheel covers that are held on with lug nuts, you'll need the different model with the little ridges on them so they can do two jobs at once. Whew, a lot of detail for a pretty small part.
First they are calling them defective. Being a Ford Tech of 30+ years, abuse or damaged, like the guy mentioned above rotating your tires is not considered a "Failure" or "Defective". Most Tire shops either hand torque or use torque sticks. Hell Les Schwab Tires only has low setting on their air guns for forward oper. Second,Fords not the only one to use these type lug nuts, every auto maker out there is trying to save $$$. They put out a Bid on parts and someone wins that bid. So if you save .25 cents on every lug nut and you buy 1 million, thats a 250k savings. Just on lug nuts.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Honestly I think the person who tightened my wheels probably didn’t take much care and used a 3/4” socket instead of 19mm probably. :(


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And to think that Ford might have put that $250k savings toward some engineering and testing that could have prevented a bunch of DEFECTIVE auto-shift transmissions from being put on Focuses and Fiestas!

We are getting into semantics here with terms such as faulty, defective, failure-prone, etc. For a lot of Ford owners that have cars with these "hollow" lug nuts with a little plastic cap on the end that makes them appear to be solid, they do DEFORM. No question about it. Maybe if they are treated with utmost care with the proper size socket, correct torquing, etc. they will stay pristine. But in the real world, they DEFORM. And in the case with a lot of the ones I've had on my car, the caps fall off and they become an eyesore. It's a problem for which I would have gladly paid a few bucks more to avoid.

The time to find out that you have these deformed caps is not when you get a flat and are on the shoulder of the highway with cars whizzing by and you're trying, without success, to get a lug wrench to remove them. Without success. On my Escape I purchased tires from Tire Rack and then took to a local authorized installer to have them mounted and put on. That installer pulled me out of the waiting room to show me the buggered up lug nuts, and he refused to put on my new tires. He wasn't being a prick about it, he just pointed out that if they hammered a socket on the nuts to get them off and then put them back on, there would come a time when I would be cursing them. He said that if I removed the nuts and put good ones on, they'd be happy to mount my tires. That's exactly what I did. But I'm telling you it was a PITA to get the old ones off, and that's what compelled me to spend another $30 to purchase the set of sockets designed to work on buggered up nuts.

My cars, all of them Ford products, now have nice-looking, highly functional and not-likely-to-deform solid steel lug nuts that set me back an average of $14 a set delivered (of either 16 or 20 depending on the vehicle). For me that's money well spent.
 

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Discussion Starter #20


All 20 lug nuts are like this.

We took a hammer and gently tapped the socket into it so that I can be removed.

Once removed we filed it down just a tiny bit.

I’ll be ordering the lug nuts posted at the beginning of this thread. Thanks again!



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