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Discussion Starter #1
I know the factory interval is something like 100K, but I was wondering when the majority of you all changed yours out?

My wife's 08' now has over 65K so I was thinking about changing them. Do I need new coil boots when I do this, or just clean the factory ones?

Or should I just let it go till it hits 100K?

Thanks,
Greg
 

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The only sure way to tell is to pull them all out and look at them. Plugs are cheap, can't go wrong putting in new ones. Boots are the same way, depends on there condition.
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I just changed the plugs on my 06 ST at 75000 miles. Runs like brand new and the gas mileage is 2-4 mpg better. Also change oil and fuel fliters to cover all the bases.
 

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I change mine at 10k but I use Autolite 103 copper plugs. I also change out the boots about once a year or after 20k miles.
 

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I change mine at 10k but I use Autolite 103 copper plugs. I also change out the boots about once a year or after 20k miles.
Same here. Change them at about 10K
 

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I don't understand why everyone feels the need to change the plugs at 10000 miles that is rather excessive in my opinion. I would just like to say that car manufacturers are not going to recommend a certain maintenance interval without having thought the matter through and after much real world testing. If the manual says 100000 miles for standard usage that is what I'm going to do my money and time are much to important to be worrying about such mundane things. I have an '03 with 80000 and an '07 with 50000 both run great by following fords schedule.
 

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My advice is still to just pull them out and have a look at them, the '01 Ford Ranger I had before my Focus had the same 100K plugs but they were junk by the time I hit 50K. Looking at them cost nothing more then a few mins of your time and can help you to shot other more serious problems like leaky valve stem seals and what not.
 

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Changed out the ones in the ZX3 at about 90k miles and got about a 2 mpg increase in fuel economy. The 100k plug change out that so many vehicles have gone to is part advertizing ploy and part better technology.
 

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2008 Focus FE 2.0 Engine

I just changed my original spark plugs with 132,000 miles on them and they gapped and looked just fine. They were an iridium plug ITR 5F13.
I replaced them with the Motorcraft SP-448 (AGSF-32Y-PC) that appeared to be identical.

I have determined by my experience with all my Ford vehicles that have platinum or Iridium plugs in them it is a waste of my money to change before 100K. I changed the original plugs in my daughters 2005 Ford 500 V6 that had 130,000 on it and those plugs looked fine also.

I have done well using a combination of manufacture recommendations and take a peek on modern vehicle maintenance. These are not the leaded gasoline and distributer contacts monsters we used to take care of. [:D]
 

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Pulled 'em out, checked 'em, never seized & reinstalled at about 75,000. Didn't want to worry about getting them out later...
 

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I don't understand why everyone feels the need to change the plugs at 10000 miles that is rather excessive in my opinion. I would just like to say that car manufacturers are not going to recommend a certain maintenance interval without having thought the matter through and after much real world testing. If the manual says 100000 miles for standard usage that is what I'm going to do my money and time are much to important to be worrying about such mundane things. I have an '03 with 80000 and an '07 with 50000 both run great by following fords schedule.
Those people are runnning copper plugs, not platinum.

New plugs are under $20 and fifteen minutes, if there is any improvement in fuel economy it will pay for itself.

I am sure your cars run fine, but you have only one data point with nothing to compare it to.
 

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Never Seize

Pulled 'em out, checked 'em, never seized & reinstalled at about 75,000. Didn't want to worry about getting them out later...
Never seize is one of the smartest things we can use on almost everything that could rust or seize up to have a little compassion for the next person that has to take it apart. Lug nuts included! [twothumbs]
 

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Lug nuts don't get stuck usually because they are rusted, but because they are over torqued.

Anti seizing your lug nuts lubricates the threads which changes the amount of twisting youre going to do before the reach the approved torque spec. This puts more stress on the threads of both the nut and stud. Also with the lubricant in there, you have the possibility of the lug nuts coming loose because you "thought" they were tight enough.

I don't recomend anyone anti seize their lug nuts.
 

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Lug nuts don't get stuck usually because they are rusted, but because they are over torqued.

Anti seizing your lug nuts lubricates the threads which changes the amount of twisting youre going to do before the reach the approved torque spec. This puts more stress on the threads of both the nut and stud. Also with the lubricant in there, you have the possibility of the lug nuts coming loose because you "thought" they were tight enough.

I don't recomend anyone anti seize their lug nuts.
Agreed. If you have to put it on your lug nuts anyways then your doing it wrong[wrenchin]
 

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A bit off the spark plug subject... You'll get arguments about never seize there as well.

If you aren't from a real "Rust Belt" area you won't see why it's such a religion to use that product wherever possible. Thread lock as a substitute in the few places it's really not advisable.

Heck - if you don't use it on the wheel hubs when installing aluminum wheels, give it some time & you won't even NEED the lug nuts - wheels are corroded on so tight you could drive a ways without them. People have loosened the nuts & driven around to break them loose & they still don't come off.

Gettysburg is where people from around here go to find cars that aren't badly rusted, and unless you're by the Ocean in TX, who worries about rust/corrosion down there? Only antiques have corrosion issues to compare at all when out of the Salt zone.

NOT using the stuff up here is the mark of half-assed work on a car you never expect to work on again.
 

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A bit off the spark plug subject... You'll get arguments about never seize there as well.

If you aren't from a real "Rust Belt" area you won't see why it's such a religion to use that product wherever possible. Thread lock as a substitute in the few places it's really not advisable.

Heck - if you don't use it on the wheel hubs when installing aluminum wheels, give it some time & you won't even NEED the lug nuts - wheels are corroded on so tight you could drive a ways without them. People have loosened the nuts & driven around to break them loose & they still don't come off.

Gettysburg is where people from around here go to find cars that aren't badly rusted, and unless you're by the Ocean in TX, who worries about rust/corrosion down there? Only antiques have corrosion issues to compare at all when out of the Salt zone.

NOT using the stuff up here is the mark of half-assed work on a car you never expect to work on again.
Agree and disagree. We lubricate hubs at work cause they stick on just as you stated. BUT in areas where a item is supposed to be torqued dry you should not apply a lubricant (e.g. head bolts, lug bolts, crank bolt, etc). Now I'm curious as to what the Ford service manual says, anyone got one?

Hijack over lol.
 

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You are actually correct - Lugs are supposed to be torqued Clean & Dry.

Wish you were wrong, and that lubricated was the standard - it would avoid so many of the corrosion issues that make repair difficult & expensive.

The days of "Grease is cheaper than bearings, so use plenty" are long gone. That quote is from the Model T era, and I don't know how long it lasted past that. Using the minimum necessary saves $, and isn't often an issue during warranty.

Corroded fasteners need more torque to tighten properly, lubricated need less, crossing fingers a bit & lubricating corroded fasteners seems to work in practice.

Avoiding over-torque becomes more important, I've seen 20% as a recommended reduction on clean fasteners. Gets into judgement calls on re-use of fasteners at all sometimes.

Nice clean Engine components aren't an issue (head, crank as you mentioned). Spark plugs can be, steel into aluminum is the worst & almost universal currently.

Never-Seize has been wonderful whenever I chose to use it, brakes that work for years instead of giving trouble is just one example.

Guess it depends on circumstances. In a salt corrosion environment it can save a lot of grief.
 

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Not arguing with you there, corrosion does suck big time.

I like using it on areas that you know are going to be a problem such as exhaust bolts, glow plugs, spark plugs, differing metals (steel bolts into aluminum and vice versa), etc, etc.

Anti-seizing everything is not good practice IMO lol. I just had an audi come into work that had the lug bolts covered in goop. All that did was make a mess for me to clean up and even then I was not comfortable that the wheels were torqued properly. Not much you can do though.

I've just never seen a wheel stuck due to corrosion on the threads of the hub or studs/nuts. The hub and wheel surface itself (center) yes, all the time. Just cleaning that up makes a world of a difference the next time around, and a little bit of grease usually stops any future issues
 
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