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I was driving about 45mph and my 2007 Ford Focus lost power. I towed the vehicle home and when you put the key in the ignition and try to turn on, all the dash warning lights come on but there's no clicking noise and I can't turn the car on. I've recently replaced the battery, all the fuses are good, I tried putting in new spark plugs and sprayed the intake on some advise from friends but it still won't start. Before I go to a repair shop I want to see if anyone has advise and if it's even worth the $$ to fix it.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
just tried replacing the ignition switch as well, but that didn't fix it either.
 

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How recently did you replace the battery? Try jump starting your car. If it starts but stalls shortly thereafter, I'd lean toward the alternator as your likely culprit. Google will point you to a night's worth of reading on how to determine if your alternator is bad.

Assuming the alternator is causing your problem, Rockauto sells alternators for ~$150-$200 for your car. There are a few videos on Youtube explaining how to replace the alternator on a 2005-07 Focus like yours. I'd watch those videos to see if it's a job you want to take on.

If you pay for a shop to replace the alternator, they'll likely charge you their cost for the alternator plus 50-100% markup ($250-$300+) plus a couple hours labor to install it at ~$50-$80 / hr.

I'd plan on spending ~$500-$600 to have a shop swap out your alternator.
 

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Or, we can avoid jumping to conclusions and actually work our way through the problem..... Funny that mechanics and dealerships get insulted so frequently on this forum, yet half this forum recommends replacing parts without doing any diagnostic work....

Check the battery cable ends. Make sure they can't move on the battery posts. Make sure there's no corrosion. Take the battery to your local parts store (or wherever you got it) and have it tested. That's where you should be starting, before ever considering replacing anything.
 

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Thank you! I will have the battery checked, there was corrosion on my last battery but this one does not show any. Put a new battery in about 6 months ago. Had the alternator checked at that time and the dealer said it was fine.

If anyone has anything else to try I am all ears.
 

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How recently did you replace the battery? Try jump starting your car. If it starts but stalls shortly thereafter, I'd lean toward the alternator as your likely culprit. Google will point you to a night's worth of reading on how to determine if your alternator is bad.

Assuming the alternator is causing your problem, Rockauto sells alternators for ~$150-$200 for your car. There are a few videos on Youtube explaining how to replace the alternator on a 2005-07 Focus like yours. I'd watch those videos to see if it's a job you want to take on.

If you pay for a shop to replace the alternator, they'll likely charge you their cost for the alternator plus 50-100% markup ($250-$300+) plus a couple hours labor to install it at ~$50-$80 / hr.

I'd plan on spending ~$500-$600 to have a shop swap out your alternator.
Same thing happened to my 2007 Focus about 4 years ago. It was the alternator.
 

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Same thing happened to my 2007 Focus about 4 years ago. It was the alternator.
That doesn't necessarily mean it's the same cause now. Making stupid assumptions is what leads to people spending more money than necessary to fix a simple problem.

The alternator has nothing to do with starting the car. The battery does. Therefore, you start with the battery and it's connections. To properly test an alternator, you need a good battery.
 

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That doesn't necessarily mean it's the same cause now. Making stupid assumptions is what leads to people spending more money than necessary to fix a simple problem.

The alternator has nothing to do with starting the car. The battery does. Therefore, you start with the battery and it's connections. To properly test an alternator, you need a good battery.
No need to be rude.
This person was driving their vehicle down the road and it died. That strongly suggests an alternator. I'm not saying that it is the an alternator but a multimeter would potentially solve this problem in about 5 minutes.
Everyone needs a multimeter.




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No need to be rude.
This person was driving their vehicle down the road and it died. That strongly suggests an alternator. I'm not saying that it is the an alternator but a multimeter would potentially solve this problem in about 5 minutes.
Everyone needs a multimeter.


Sent from my LG-LS997 using Tapatalk
Again, you need a good battery to test an alternator. You also need a vehicle that starts. The alternator is PCM controlled, which means you also need a scantool able to read PID values. Or you can look at a DVOM and hope you're not wasting money.... The PCM is capable of setting codes for the charging system. For most of us, it makes more sense to do actual diagnostics prior to replacing parts. Seems to save a lot of money.
 

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You're right of course. I'm just saying what happened to my car several years ago. It may be a good place to start the trouble shooting. Cheers.
 

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A good battery will show 12.65 volts, no less, key off. Running you should have 13.6 to 14.7 no more, no less. These alternators are in a tough spot right next to the exhaust. Furthermore, the battery charge cable is overly long and will develop high resistance due to age. Battery terminal corrosion is the first sign the alternator is not functioning properly. Load testing the battery is a good idea but voltage testing is more important imho. The fact the car dies leads me to believe the alternator is bad as well. Parts store alternators are garbage. Buy new, not rebuilt, online.
 

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That doesn't necessarily mean it's the same cause now. Making stupid assumptions is what leads to people spending more money than necessary to fix a simple problem.

The alternator has nothing to do with starting the car. The battery does. Therefore, you start with the battery and it's connections. To properly test an alternator, you need a good battery.
Dont be a dick sir.
 

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A good battery will show 12.65 volts, no less, key off. Running you should have 13.6 to 14.7 no more, no less. These alternators are in a tough spot right next to the exhaust. Furthermore, the battery charge cable is overly long and will develop high resistance due to age. Battery terminal corrosion is the first sign the alternator is not functioning properly. Load testing the battery is a good idea but voltage testing is more important imho. The fact the car dies leads me to believe the alternator is bad as well. Parts store alternators are garbage. Buy new, not rebuilt, online.
The OP stated that the car died and will not restart. Only the dash lights come on.

Testing for voltage alone is pointless and doesn't prove a battery good. A battery can produce 12V+ without producing the amperage necessary to turn the starter.

Before condemning an alternator, the OP needs to get the car to crank over and start. Which he has stated it will currently not do. Until the car is returned to a state in which it is able to start and run, there's no reason to replace anything. A failed PCM can have the exact same result as the OP has described. I've even see it from a failed O2 sensor... Everyone needs to stop jumping to conclusions and instead help the OP get the car to a condition where proper diagnosis is possible without potentially wasting money. As long as the car won't start, the alternator isn't a concern.
 

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The OP stated that the car died and will not restart. Only the dash lights come on.

Testing for voltage alone is pointless and doesn't prove a battery good. A battery can produce 12V+ without producing the amperage necessary to turn the starter.

Before condemning an alternator, the OP needs to get the car to crank over and start. Which he has stated it will currently not do. Until the car is returned to a state in which it is able to start and run, there's no reason to replace anything. A failed PCM can have the exact same result as the OP has described. I've even see it from a failed O2 sensor... Everyone needs to stop jumping to conclusions and instead help the OP get the car to a condition where proper diagnosis is possible without potentially wasting money. As long as the car won't start, the alternator isn't a concern.
You are correct. I misread his post. If it will not turn over either the battery has no amps, although doubtful as I assume he swapped batteries trying to remedy and had a similar result, or the starter has gone bad. It wouldn't hurt to have both load tested.
 

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'Load testing the battery is a good idea but voltage testing is more important imho.'

You are definitely going to run into problems eventually thinking that. The alts can charge up to 15 and be fine too. I've found that 13.6 volt can be a solid marker of at least one dead diode, the voltage setpoint in regulator is 14.0.
 

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Btw, don't argue with amc49....you won't like where that leads....
Every charging system is a little different. Some will charge as low as 13.2V at idle/no load without issue while some will charge upwards of 14.5V at idle/no load without issue. This is where it's important to know the intended voltage output for the specific charging system.

You are correct. I misread his post. If it will not turn over either the battery has no amps, although doubtful as I assume he swapped batteries trying to remedy and had a similar result, or the starter has gone bad. It wouldn't hurt to have both load tested.
OP said he/she replaced the battery 6 months ago, so it should be under warranty if it's bad. Since the vehicle won't crank/start, charging and load testing the battery is the best place to start. We'll need a good battery to proceed anyway. Best ways to test a starter is to either jump the terminals (preferably with a starter button) or use a multimeter and look at voltage drop while attempting to crank.

Questions that haven't been asked, but need to be answered if the battery tests good and the car still doesn't crank are.... (I'm assuming no crank because the OP says "dash warning lights come on but there's no clicking noise and I can't turn the car on "
1. Did the battery warning light come on before the car shut off?
2. What exactly happens when attempting to start the car. (Do the lights dim? Does the security light flash? Do the lights go out?)
3. Is there 12V+ at the starter?

You're right of course. I'm just saying what happened to my car several years ago. It may be a good place to start the trouble shooting. Cheers.
The problem with starting troubleshooting by replacing parts, is that you waste money for no reason. The alternator has nothing to do with the vehicle starting, therefore replacing the alternator at this point, is pointless. This is what most people fail to understand. As a technician, we can only diagnose the problem that is immediately in front of us. If the OP were to have his Focus towed to a shop, they would start out focusing on the no start issue. Diagnosis would stop at that point, and a repair attempt would be made. Once the vehicle is able to start and run, they would proceed to look for the failure that resulted in the vehicle shutting off. Once the second cause is identified, they would attempt another repair. With some shops, this may result in multiple diagnostic charges, and multiple repair charges. In the interest of saving the OP time and money, it's better to take things step by step. Step 1, is to get the car started and running. Step 2, verify the condition of the charging system. This is actually pretty easy, since the OP has everything he/she needs to load test the charging system. Conveniently, every car comes with perfect load testing equipment. Just add a multimeter and you're all set. The point where things become iffy is the fact that the charging system is PCM controlled. It's helpful to know what voltage the PCM is seeing, and what voltage the PCM is commanding, but without a code reader that supports PID data readout, we'll be a bit blind. This is where investing a little money to get an OBDLink MX and Forscan is a good idea.... But, we'll make due for now.

Below, you'll find the most accurate thing ever posted on this forum....
Everyone needs a multimeter.
If you don't have one, get one. If you don't know how to use one, learn.
 

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Exactly and even up to the not arguing with me part, because I can be full of crap...............OP car here is an '07 with a different alt type and it may not necessarily be exactly in that exact voltage range. Temperature if high will also alter charging volts as the PCM compensates. You just can't win. Why learning voltmeter in 5 minutes or so can and will save you literally thousands if you are still young enough to recoup the benefit of knowing it. Hell, I have like 5 of them that Harbor Freight was giving away free, you don't even have to spend money there. You measure what it charges at while working good then you always have an idea of what right may look like.
 

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I was driving about 45mph and my 2007 Ford Focus lost power. I towed the vehicle home and when you put the key in the ignition and try to turn on, all the dash warning lights come on but there's no clicking noise and I can't turn the car on. I've recently replaced the battery, all the fuses are good, I tried putting in new spark plugs and sprayed the intake on some advise from friends but it still won't start. Before I go to a repair shop I want to see if anyone has advise and if it's even worth the $$ to fix it.
Try to lower your steering wheel and start your car . My focus does the same i have to keep adjusting my steering wheel before it will start then I have to put it back the way I want it .when you park your car you have to make sure your tires is straight that way you wont to keep moving your steering wheel everytime you start your car.let me know if it works for you because it does for me everytime
 

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I was driving about 45mph and my 2007 Ford Focus lost power. I towed the vehicle home and when you put the key in the ignition and try to turn on, all the dash warning lights come on but there's no clicking noise and I can't turn the car on. I've recently replaced the battery, all the fuses are good, I tried putting in new spark plugs and sprayed the intake on some advise from friends but it still won't start. Before I go to a repair shop I want to see if anyone has advise and if it's even worth the $$ to fix it.
Check your ignition fuse. My brother was having a bad time with his and it kept blowing the fuse
 
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