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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone else experienced this problem? 2.3L on 07' ST 12,000 and change...especially yesterday with really rainy and moist conditions, the car would crank and crank for a while...I'd stop after maybe 3-5 seconds of cranking, then go at it again. Usually on the 2nd or 3rd try it would finally fire up, run rough for a second or two, and then run fine. Car runs smooth in all other aspects, going to local Ford dealer to have them take a look under warranty on Tuesday.

Thoughts/past experiences?
 

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i sometimes have a delayed start
 

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Happens to a lot of us....there is a TSB on it to reprogram the PCM that is supposed to fix that. But I've heard that an aftermarket throttle body fixes that too.

Mine does the same thing also and I have just been too lazy to hook up our IDS at work and reprogram it myself. Yes, I work at Ford.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hitting the gas before you start or during the startup?

And I wasn't able to find the TSB online anywhere? Strange
 

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I 'think' that the ECU program is giving to much fuel during coldstart. I have found that if it does not fire right away, if you hold the accelerator open and crank, you will get an immediate start (at which time you take your foot off the accelerator btw) . Not a good start, just sorta limps along for a few seconds then gets it act together. Now when it is very cold, this is a good thing as the engines fires decisively. It seems to be that 'middlin' temp range that's the problem. So that would be what? The head temp sensor maybe?
 

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My 2.0 also does this. I just tap the gas as I turn the key and it starts right up.
 

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Hitting the gas pedal will clear it up also I've found out
I don't think that's a good idea. Everything I've heard says don't hit the gas before the engine is running when you are fuel injected. You can only do it on a carbureted engine.

Anyone one else back this up?
 

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I don't think that's a good idea. Everything I've heard says don't hit the gas before the engine is running when you are fuel injected. You can only do it on a carbureted engine.

Anyone one else back this up?
Hmmm. So what are the downsides if you know. And not to point to the obvious to much, but a few of us are doing it... and it works! [target]
 

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On a carbureted engine it is necessary to depress the gas pedal to allow the choke to close and pull up the fast idle cam. It just isn't necessary for a fuel injected engine because the PCM will enrichen the mixture, replacing the choke, and the IAC will allow more air into the engine to increase the idle speed until the engine warms up. If the engine starts better by opening the throttle slightly, that indicates an inappropriate mixture is being calculated by the PCM during starting and the mixture modification isn't hurting anything. Also, if you suspect that a fuel injected engine has become flooded, holding the throttle wide open during starting is usually a signal to the PCM to shut off the fuel injectors, much the same as holding the throttle wide open for a cabureted engine forces the choke plate partly open to allow more air into the engine and pump out any excessive fuel.
 

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Hmmm. So what are the downsides if you know. And not to point to the obvious to much, but a few of us are doing it... and it works! [target]
First off, If you depress the gas pedal before you start a fuel injected engine all your doing is opening and closing the throttle blade. There is no gas being injected at any point without the PCM recognizing the engine being turned over (starting) or running.

At the same time you are changing the value of the TPS voltage by pressing the gas pedal with the key in the "on" position which may help reset the voltage abd ultimatly help start the engine. I heard there was a TSB released from Ford for this problem. It has something to do with the TPS sensor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks for the conversation guys. It doesn't sound like tapping the gas before starting can be harmful, maybe I'll give this a try and see. Today it didn't start hard at all and I started the engine maybe 6 or 8 times.

At any rate, I will let you know what the local Ford dealer has to say and if it is picked up by warranty or not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Yes I do turn the key and wait for several seconds before cranking. This should be ample time, shouldn't it?
 

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I've always waited for my gauges to initialize and show their values before cranking the engine, but after thinking about it, there may be a practical reason for waiting. Most computers take some time to "boot up", and the PCM being a computer of sorts, may need a couple of seconds to initialize, read it's sensors, and calculate timing and fuel requirements before it's ready to start the engine. In any case, it can't hurt to wait a bit after turning the key to "On" to allow the PCM to get ready and the fuel pressure to build before turning the key to "Start".
 

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I don't think that's a good idea. Everything I've heard says don't hit the gas before the engine is running when you are fuel injected. You can only do it on a carbureted engine.

Anyone one else back this up?
Like someone said before, it doesn't do anything except move the throttle body butterfly...which I've noticed works for me and stops the hesitation and fires the motor right up. Not harmful in the least bit...carb'd or fuel injected.

I know there is a TSB on it. The dealer can pull it for you if they feel like doing it.

You should be able to get in the car, turn the key, and it bust off right then and there. You don't need to wait for fuel pressure to build up...theres always pressure on the system...thats why when you take off the fuel filter it sprays gas everywhere....
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I thought that the pressure would remain because when you turn off your engine the pressure is not released (i.e. the fuel in the lines doesn't go anywhere).

Dropped the car off at the dealer today, will post tomorrow when they call me as to what is wrong/up/needed for the car.
 
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