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Discussion Starter #1
GF was driving the 140k 2001 Ford Focus DOHC SE wagon home today and stalled at a stop sign on a side street.

The blue 15 amp fuel pump fuse in the power distribution box was discovered slow blown (non-violently). All other fuses look good. The car will crank and all lights are normal, but obviously won't start.

She said there was a faint chemical smell coming from the general direction of the drivers footwell that instantaneously coincided with the quick sputtering stall. I'm guessing some melted wiring fault? Blowing fuses don't smell, right?

She was forced to drive through some rough terrain all day in a shipyard at work and was careful. On the way home she drove through a badly flooded roadway carefully. It was quite dark but don't believe depth was above hubs. I believe this may be the cause, although the stall occurred about 5-6 miles later during slower driving at the end of the commute home.

Should I try replacing the fuse first? See how far to get stranded again? I have read there is a fuel power module under the back passenger seat that has a grommet to the tank. I'm wondering if a short could occur there. Could water enter the connector causing a temp short?

Trying to rule out the circuit before i have to drop the tank if it's an internal short on the assembly/motor.


Thanks in advance!
 

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Blowing fuse could have a smell, though it's usually not noticed.

Give a new one a try, the "water in a connector" theory is always a possibility given the unusual conditions, even though you'd hope not.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the lighting fast reply. I guess the proximity of the power block to the cowl might take in some smell if the fan was on esp?

If it blows this time just by turning the key on, I'll know there's a solid short...
 

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Don't drop the tank. There are plenty of other things to check before that. Besides, if the wiring was shorting in the tank..... don't you think you might have other big problems? I've never heard of this happening outside of Hollywood gangster movies though.

So you have a crank but no start issue?

Do you smell fuel when you crank the engine? Do you hear the fuel pump buzz when you first turn the key to ON? If both these are yes, then just ignore the fuel pump for now. If not, then it is possible that you have an evil coincidence on your hand. At your mileage, I'd suspect a fuel pump, especially since it's an 00, unless you know the pump was changed out under warranty. If that was the case, then I'd not suspect the pump.

To test the fuel pump module if the pump does not buzz for 3 secs when the key is turned to ON, unplug the side of the module that goes into the grommet to the pump, and use a digital multi-meter to test for voltage. DO not use an old analog tester or a resistive tester which has a bar, lights, or LEDs that light up depending on voltage. Likewise be careful not to short the tester leads against the chassis. Now if you don't get voltage, test the input side of the module for voltage on the plug-in this time. If you still don't get voltage, then test the fuel cutoff switch in the passenger kick panel by unplugging the switch, bypass the switch with a paperclip or wire across the pins in the plug-in, or test the switch using continuity or ohms on your tester. You can also simply see if you can press down on the button before you remove the kick panel to get to the plug. It has about 1/4" of travel when it's been tripped, and should click back in place. If you do end up finding that it is faulty and won't reset, so you bypass it- get a replacement switch as soon as possible. That cuts the fuel off in the event of an accident. Don't be like the girl whom I stopped to help who was in an old Chevy that was steadily pumping fuel on the ground. Electric pumps will just keep going without an inertia switch.
 

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I'm betting on water tossed up on top of fuel tank to douse the connector by going in the deep water, that could easily do it, took a couple minutes to soak into the connector. If so car simply sitting may dry it back out, or cause corrosion to lead to more issues later.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It's about a 15- 20 minute drive so I'm hoping your right.

MAYBE the short occurred within a few minutes of water entering area and soaking and slowly increased current draw until the actual stall when it finally blew the fuse. You're basically feeding the short and pump; they're both drawing current.

It was all secondary roads so would the pump be demanding less current than a highway run?
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Don't drop the tank. There are plenty of other things to check before that. Besides, if the wiring was shorting in the tank..... don't you think you might have other big problems? I've never heard of this happening outside of Hollywood gangster movies though.

So you have a crank but no start issue?

Do you smell fuel when you crank the engine? Do you hear the fuel pump buzz when you first turn the key to ON? If both these are yes, then just ignore the fuel pump for now. If not, then it is possible that you have an evil coincidence on your hand. At your mileage, I'd suspect a fuel pump, especially since it's an 00, unless you know the pump was changed out under warranty. If that was the case, then I'd not suspect the pump.

To test the fuel pump module if the pump does not buzz for 3 secs when the key is turned to ON, unplug the side of the module that goes into the grommet to the pump, and use a digital multi-meter to test for voltage. DO not use an old analog tester or a resistive tester which has a bar, lights, or LEDs that light up depending on voltage. Likewise be careful not to short the tester leads against the chassis. Now if you don't get voltage, test the input side of the module for voltage on the plug-in this time. If you still don't get voltage, then test the fuel cutoff switch in the passenger kick panel by unplugging the switch, bypass the switch with a paperclip or wire across the pins in the plug-in, or test the switch using continuity or ohms on your tester. You can also simply see if you can press down on the button before you remove the kick panel to get to the plug. It has about 1/4" of travel when it's been tripped, and should click back in place. If you do end up finding that it is faulty and won't reset, so you bypass it- get a replacement switch as soon as possible. That cuts the fuel off in the event of an accident. Don't be like the girl whom I stopped to help who was in an old Chevy that was steadily pumping fuel on the ground. Electric pumps will just keep going without an inertia switch.
Well I replaced the fuse and it blew immediately as key turned to on position. Did not hear pump run.

Measured at plug to fuel pump module and found continuity between what I believe is power (green w orange stripe) and ground (solid black) to pump (think I confirmed this in next paragraph). There is only one connector (with upstream and downstream wires in same plug?) and can only identity individual wire connection by direction it "flows" into harness.



Next went upstream and found Inertia switch tested good for continuity. Found continuity between chassis ground and power (green w orange stripe) with fuel module plug connected; disconnected, NO continuity. Bingo.



Evidence indicates at this point it is beyond the plug at or in the tank. Can I blast or try and suck some water out through the grommet? Other wise what, just wait til it finally stops raining in 24 hrs and hope it dries before I *gasp* drop the tank?
 

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Some think it's easier and some don't.................you can cut a hole under back seat cushion to get to the plug and pump as well. What I did changing mine. It saves disconnecting and reconnecting old hoses to tank (several) that can give problems if they don't 100% seal when installed again. The evap system pressurizes tank to a couple of psi of so and pops codes with any leak at all.

http://www.focusfanatics.com/forum/showthread.php?t=276213&highlight=cutting+fuel+pump+hole

Note there is an evap hose that runs high on passenger side of car, it runs close enough at the rear pass corner that common to accidentally cut it while cutting the hole. If you do again, evap code because of a leak there. Look close in pics and you can see that hose and how close it is to the cut line there. Also you can see that the electrical connector is sideways so won't be getting much water out of the waterproof seal there without pulling it apart.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Is that grommet in the same location as the wagon? I don't remember it that far forward. ..

How thick is this sheet metal?

How bad are just the hoses resealing in the front if you tip it down that way. Read you can get it out without completely dropping it.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
UPDATE :

I turned the key to ON with a fresh fuse and DID hear the pump run for a second only to find the fuse blown again (did this twice). (GF must been tired).

I also was able to reach in and disconnect the harness from the pump assembly through the grommet. Did not see signs of water. Did not have continuity between 12v and ground at module plug as did before.
 

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Just for giggles try turning it on a few times with the pump disconnected (since you managed to reach that).

It might help determine if it's a coincidental fuel pump issue or in the wiring to it.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Well I just had a hell of a giggle...

Fresh fuse, pulled plug at fuel pump, STILL BLEW!

Unplugged the FPCM, repeated NO BLOWN FUSE!
Wow, might I be the only other one in 6-7 years to have a bad one? ??
 

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I've only seen that recently when the FPDM had gotten wet.
 

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Dunno what killed it, but from that test it sure looks dead.

The post I remembered was one where it had been thoroughly wetted & the poster wondered if it could be dried out to work again. Like when someone got deep enough to have water half way up the kick panel inside the car & it got the PCM wet.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
FPDM certainly was dry as a bone so I'm guessing somewhere else water did it in from.

There's another grommet in the floor that I hadn't pulled upstream of the FPDM. Well off to the junkyard today to find me another one (or spare two).

Any thoughts on whether a failing fuel pump could cause FPDM to go?
 

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They fail so rarely hard to tell. FPDM I mean. You could just run jumper from the FPDM power lead at plug to pump and another for pump ground and motor pump without module in the loop to see if pump appears to run right by itself. It will work as a standalone part, the module simply slows it down when not needed at full speed.
 

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If running as AMC suggested...

"run jumper from the FPDM power lead at plug to pump"

...then circuit is already fused...no additional fuse necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Well I picked up a module off a fresh '05 wagon at the yard today for $20 (different part number than existing so check dealership if ya try this). Had front end collision so I figured FPDM was good when it hit. Lucky since this place only had 3 foci, also 01 and 02 sedans.

Popped it in tonight and it fired right up! I think it cruises smoother and stronger than it did ever before up to and especially at 60-70mph.

Getting DTC 9202 in the cluster test, but I guess this came up after I blew a couple fuses trouble shooting. Wasn't there initially. Fuel gauge seems fine. Probably just BS.

Thanks ya'll! Major rep to you sailor for tempting me to unplug the pump!
 
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