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Hello,

I purchased a 2005 ZX4 over a year ago in the summertime. After a couple of months, if I didn't drive my car for 3 days in a row, my battery would die. I bought a brand new battery, thinking that was the issue, but the problem persisted. In the colder months, the car dies on a daily basis, so I have to keep my car plugged into a trickle charger so that I know I can drive it to work in the mornings.

The times the battery does die, when I try to turn it on, the engine tries to roll over for a a couple of seconds, and then it just stops. My CD changer starts to skip for a while with an annoying ticking noise, and my power locks stop working.

My car is in the shop right now for a hole in my radiator, so I asked the techs to take a look at my battery. They called me and told me that they can't find the problem, but that my battery is reading "low." The tech asked me if I have anything in my car that might draw power from the battery, like if my doors don't shut all the way, or the trunk, etc. The only thing I can think of is that my car came with a factory sub woofer and stereo system, but I never use it so I turned it off.

I did some internet searches, and some people with similar problems suggest that it's a problem with the electrical system and that adding a second wire (8ga) from the alternator to the battery would help. Someone else wrote that if you have a Z-Tec engine with a "smart charging system" that the car requires a silver calcium alloy battery--but I don't know if I have that type of engine or not...

My battery light has never once come on, either, so it never gives me an indication if it's getting low or not.

With winter fast approaching, I want to get the problem fixed if possible. Has anyone else had this problem, and if so, how did you get it fixed?

any help would be much appreciated.
Emily
P.S. I've had my car in the shop for this problem once at my local Ford dealership, and they cleaned the nodes and did some minor little adjustments, as I had already installed a brand new battery, and that didn't fix the problem.
 

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BACON?
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3,170 Posts
The mechanics should have a better answer for you and they should be able to tell you where the draw is. The test that needs to be preformed is called a parasitic draw test. Basically you connect a Digital multi meter in series with the battery. After the control modules go to sleep you can read how many amps are being drawn. then go through and pull every fuse one at a time until the draw is down bellow the acceptable mark. the issue is typically located on the fuse that makes it drop the most. It takes time but that's about it.
 

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Trump 2016
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12,990 Posts
i would pull the wires for amp maybe the guy who installed it put the power wire on directly meaning it has power all the time start there
 

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Check the three wires coming off the alternator. These wires are known for corroding or breaking which leads to the voltage regulator on the alternator going bad. You should run a voltage reader on the battery when it's idling to check if the battery is being charged.
 
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