Brake Line Size - Focus Fanatics
Ford Focus Forum
HomeContact UsAbout UsGalleryDiscussion ForumsMarketplace



Go Back   Focus Fanatics > Ford Focus Tech Discussions > Brakes, Suspension & Body Chassis

Brakes, Suspension & Body Chassis The place to go for answers on brakes, suspension, camber, alignment and more.

Search This Forum | Image Search | Advanced Search    
FocusFest Ford Focus Tire & Wheels FocusFanatics Merchandise

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-26-2013, 07:54 PM   #1
nomind
Focus Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Fan#: 95234
Location: Elizabethtown, KY
What I Drive: 2000 Primer ZX3

Posts: 114
FF Reputation: 3 nomind Good Standing Member
Buy-Sell-Trade Rating: (0)
Brake Line Size

So...while doing a transmission swap, I managed to crush one of the hard lines on my 2000 ZX3. Does anyone know what size the brake lines is, and what size the fittings are? I'd like to have the necessary supplies before I start pulling the old line off.


nomind is offline  
    Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 11-26-2013, 08:16 PM   #2
rexazz2
Focus Enthusiast
 
rexazz2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Fan#: 121761
Location: waterloo, Canada
What I Drive: 2014 HB SE

Posts: 541
FF Reputation: 1 rexazz2 Good Standing Member
Buy-Sell-Trade Rating: (0)
I suggest removing the old line including the fittings and taking them with you so get the matching fittings and flare style
Another thing that sometimes makes life easier is using multiple pieces and using a union to join then back up
The brake lines are usually originaly installed when the engine bay is empty so it going back in in one pre bent piece is some times nearly impossible
rexazz2 is offline  
    Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2013, 10:13 PM   #3
nomind
Focus Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Fan#: 95234
Location: Elizabethtown, KY
What I Drive: 2000 Primer ZX3

Posts: 114
FF Reputation: 3 nomind Good Standing Member
Buy-Sell-Trade Rating: (0)
I was considering running a whole new line, as its just to the front driver's side of the car, but I'm thinking that just using a compression fitting set, and just replacing that short run would be much easier. It would probably take less than 18" of line to get to a spot that I could use the compression fittings, and not have any issues. I'm just not sure if I have enough line in the wheel well to try and use a second compression fitting, and most of the short runs available at the part store already have the fittings on them, so it would just be the that small run. If I cannot find the info before hand, I will be cutting the line, and taking it to the parts store. Like I said, I'd just like to already have the supplies on hand.

Or I can dig out the double flare kit, and use an appropriate union, as apparently, not many compression fittings out there that are actually for brake line use.
nomind is offline  
    Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2013, 01:01 AM   #4
elsolo
Focus Fanatic
 
elsolo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Fan#: 96835
Location: Long Beach, CA
What I Drive: 2003 dark shadow grey metallic ZX3

Posts: 2,157
FF Reputation: 17 elsolo Great Standing Member
Buy-Sell-Trade Rating: (1)
3/16" hardline
10mm bubble flare

If you can find a ISO bubble flare tool, piece of cake.
If you already have a 45* IFF double flare tool:
You can cut and reflare the hardline with a traditional 3/8"-24 tube nut and 45* inverted double flare like all American cars have used for 40+ years, then use an adapter fitting to convert it to 10mm bubble flare at the end where the hose attaches. (Brake Quip part #BQ-49)
__________________
2.3, home fabbed Mustang GT brakes, SVT suspension
67 Chevelle SS-496, owned since 1991
elsolo is offline  
    Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2013, 01:16 AM   #5
elsolo
Focus Fanatic
 
elsolo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Fan#: 96835
Location: Long Beach, CA
What I Drive: 2003 dark shadow grey metallic ZX3

Posts: 2,157
FF Reputation: 17 elsolo Great Standing Member
Buy-Sell-Trade Rating: (1)
BrakeQuip part listing:
http://www.brakequip.com/mfthread.html

10mm ISO flare:


3/8-24 IFF flare:


Pair of BQ-49 adapter fittings on left (showing female and male ends), tube nuts for both styles on right:

another pic of those fittings, and a IFF flaring tool most mechanics have in their box.

If you can borrow a ISO bubble flare too, ignore the adapter nonsense and just reuse the old tube nuts and make a new hardline with 3/16" tubing found at every NAPA autoparts store.
__________________
2.3, home fabbed Mustang GT brakes, SVT suspension
67 Chevelle SS-496, owned since 1991
elsolo is offline  
    Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2013, 04:13 PM   #6
rexazz2
Focus Enthusiast
 
rexazz2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Fan#: 121761
Location: waterloo, Canada
What I Drive: 2014 HB SE

Posts: 541
FF Reputation: 1 rexazz2 Good Standing Member
Buy-Sell-Trade Rating: (0)
NO compression fitting is rated for brake issues

At best you could invert flare it and use a 3/16 inverted union
rexazz2 is offline  
    Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2013, 06:28 PM   #7
Dgc333
Focus Addict
 
Join Date: May 2011
Fan#: 85422
Location: Pembroke, MA
What I Drive: 2012, candy blue, SEL

Posts: 709
FF Reputation: 1 Dgc333 Good Standing Member
Buy-Sell-Trade Rating: (0)
Quote:
Originally Posted by rexazz2 View Post
NO compression fitting is rated for brake issues

At best you could invert flare it and use a 3/16 inverted union
Typical 3/16 steel brake line is rated for around 9-10,000 psi. You can get compression fittings designed to operate at that pressure from most all fitting manufacturers like Swaglok or Parker-Hannifin.

Your brake system operates around 1,500 to 2,000 psi so you have over a 4x safety margin.

I would agree the brass compression fittings you get at the hardware store that are designed to be used with soft tubing such as copper or plastic are not up to the task but to categorically say compression fittings are not rated for brake use is wrong.

FWIW, the reason flare fittings are used in auto applications is because in a high volume manufacturing environment its cheaper.
Dgc333 is online now  
    Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2013, 06:44 PM   #8
rexazz2
Focus Enthusiast
 
rexazz2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Fan#: 121761
Location: waterloo, Canada
What I Drive: 2014 HB SE

Posts: 541
FF Reputation: 1 rexazz2 Good Standing Member
Buy-Sell-Trade Rating: (0)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dgc333 View Post
Typical 3/16 steel brake line is rated for around 9-10,000 psi. You can get compression fittings designed to operate at that pressure from most all fitting manufacturers like Swaglok or Parker-Hannifin.

Your brake system operates around 1,500 to 2,000 psi so you have over a 4x safety margin.

I would agree the brass compression fittings you get at the hardware store that are designed to be used with soft tubing such as copper or plastic are not up to the task but to categorically say compression fittings are not rated for brake use is wrong.

FWIW, the reason flare fittings are used in auto applications is because in a high volume manufacturing environment its cheaper.
A mechanic doing a safety inspection would fail the vehicle if they spotted a compression fitting
I have seen shops that use copper line because they said it bends/flares easier
Again probably not the best route to take but some guys work that way
rexazz2 is offline  
    Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2013, 06:57 PM   #9
elsolo
Focus Fanatic
 
elsolo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Fan#: 96835
Location: Long Beach, CA
What I Drive: 2003 dark shadow grey metallic ZX3

Posts: 2,157
FF Reputation: 17 elsolo Great Standing Member
Buy-Sell-Trade Rating: (1)
Don't use a compression fitting.

Flare, tube nut, union

Or just remake/replace the entire hardline.
The tubing is very cheap, making brake lines is fun and easy
What's the difference in making a 12" hardline with a couple bends or a 40" harline with a few bends?
__________________
2.3, home fabbed Mustang GT brakes, SVT suspension
67 Chevelle SS-496, owned since 1991
elsolo is offline  
    Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2013, 07:55 PM   #10
iminhell
C2H5OH
 
iminhell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Fan#: 36222
Location: Darwin, MN
What I Drive: 2000 & 2001 ZX3's

Posts: 10,221
FF Reputation: 48 iminhell Great Standing Member
Buy-Sell-Trade Rating: (4)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dgc333 View Post
Typical 3/16 steel brake line is rated for around 9-10,000 psi. You can get compression fittings designed to operate at that pressure from most all fitting manufacturers like Swaglok or Parker-Hannifin.

Your brake system operates around 1,500 to 2,000 psi so you have over a 4x safety margin.

I would agree the brass compression fittings you get at the hardware store that are designed to be used with soft tubing such as copper or plastic are not up to the task but to categorically say compression fittings are not rated for brake use is wrong.
... and?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dgc333 View Post
FWIW, the reason flare fittings are used in auto applications is because in a high volume manufacturing environment its cheaper.

And that the law states compression fittings are illegal. DOT, FMVSS, SAE and various foreign bodies are all on the same page for brake fittings and lines.
http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/rules-regul...px?reg=571.106

Even for air brakes you can't use compression fittings.

Last edited by iminhell; 11-27-2013 at 10:22 PM.
iminhell is online now  
    Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks & Social Networks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:27 PM.


Copyright 2002-2014 FocusFanatics.com. All Rights Reserved : Terms of Use : Privacy Policy : Advertise Information : Site Map

Focus Fanatics Ford Focus Forum offers many fun ways for you to engage with other Ford Focus Owners from across the world. Whether it be about the aftermarket performance modifications, technical how-to's, European tuned suspension or awesome fuel economy similar to the Acura TLX or Fiesta ST. You can find all Ford Focus and Focus ST related information here. Join our Ford Focus discussion forums and chat with local Focus enthusiasts in your area.