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Old 01-07-2012, 07:58 AM   #111
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Post And

Some supplies from the shelf, e.g.,

Gallon of antifreeze
Pint of DOT4 brake fluid
Windshield washer fluid
Distilled water
Gloss black engine enamel
WD-40 and Liquid Wrench
Windex, Simple Green
Zip ties
Permatex #2 gasket sealer
Antiseize
Plastigauge
Paper towels, rags
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Old 01-09-2012, 05:04 PM   #112
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Arrow Promised tool list

Now I wouldn't expect a newbie to run out and buy all these things -- I've acquired these tools over decades, but if you buy good ones and take care of your tools they should last a very long time. And slowly it will get easier to do big projects like this one as you keep acquiring tools wisely.

I often buy tools _after_ I need them, when they come on sale. For example, today a bought a pair of wheel dollies that would have made moving the FF sideways in my workspace much easier and safer (instead of using the floor jack alone).

One thing I learned early, the hard way, in my first auto repair job was that professionals often won't loan their tools. Don't be offended, these are their "tools of the trade" and they learned the hard way about loaning stuff and not getting it back or it comes back broken, missing stuff, etc. If you do borrow stuff, return it in even better shape than you got it, and if you damaged/broke/lost/... it , buy an exact replacement to return to the guy quickly, no matter what the cost.

Here goes:

An indoor workspace with hard, level concrete floor, lots of ventilation, and an excellent stereo system (mine is a 35 year old surround-sound). "2+ cars" equivalent space for the FF plus all the parts, etc.

Two or three workbenches, with at least one being galvanized steel top (for clean work) and one with wood top and a vise (for whacking stuff, etc.).

A utility sink with hot and cold water service. Lots of various soaps too.

Excellent overhead lighting, plus droplights, etc. And all the safety gear you can imagine, and more.

A heavy duty engine hoist/crane, and engine stand. Don't go with the cheapo imports -- they often aren't strong/big enough, and this is dangerous work. I got mine, on sale of course, at Sam's Club many years ago. Also nice is an oil pan for the stand. And definitely a load leveler and engine sling for the crane. You'll also need long bolts and nuts/washers to mount the block to the stand, but you often won't know which ones until the engine is out (plan-in a trip to the store at this point; get high-grade ones, not the cheapos).

A heavy duty floor jack, bottle jack, and wheel chocks.

Various Wonder and other pry bars.

Various hammers and a rubber mallet.

Oil catch-pans (and ways to store and recycle the various fluids).

Air compressor, heavy-duty 1/2 in. impact wrench (sorry -- cheapos don't have the guts for the crank bolt), blowgun, and hose.

Magnetic pickup -- for the oopsies. But get in the practice of covering your open orifices with clean rags, duct tape, etc. to reduce problems.

High quality 3/8 and 1/2 in. torque wrenches. Used both a lot on this engine.

1/4, 3/8, and 1/2 in.-drive standard and deepwell sockets, ratchets, breaker bars, extensions, speeders, and adapters. And 3/8 and 1/2 in. standard and deep impact sockets. And Torx male and female sockets, and male hex sockets (all metric, of course, for this FF). In general it's bad form to use adapters, but I had to use them, carefully, on this job. I didn't need my flex fittings.

Combo wrenches up to 27 mm.

Gasket and razor scrapers.

Various screwdrivers and pliers; I used my large Crescent and needlenose pliers a lot.

Wire brushes, from soft brass to stiff. Cleaning brushes too, including old toothbrushes.

Metal files.

Battery charger. The battery will be out for a while, so now's a good time to desulfurize it; I use a BatteryMINDer.

Seal remover and driver.

Feeler gauges.

Glazebreaker and variable speed drill.

Ring pliers, ring compressor, and small plastic/rubber tubes to put over the rod bolts to protect the crank.

Flywheel turner -- was very useful for reinstalling the manual transmission's flywheel as will be shown in the pictures to come.

Oil filter wrench.

Antifreeze and battery fluid testers.

Magnetic parts tray and a service cart. I didn't use the cart on this job because it was too full of crap -- my bad.

Lots of fender pads and heavy towels to protect the car.

A big box of BandAids, and a large tube of Neosporin. Good health insurance too. Hospital on speed-dial.

And don't forget a set of true-blue Factory Service Manuals ("Workshop Manuals" in Ford-speak). Get 'em cheap from other members here or off eBay, for example.

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Old 01-09-2012, 05:08 PM   #113
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i think this thread should be a sticky on SPI performance! Lugnut you have done a wonderful job and im sure plenty of people will be referring to this thread for their SPI needs!
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Old 01-14-2012, 07:34 PM   #114
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Talking Here come the pics! Here come the pics! Here come the pics!

I'm editing and uploading them -- takes time. But here's the first batch:

If you are entering this thread at this point, go back and read it from the beginning, now. These pics, and short descriptions, don't tell nearly all the story, and the gory details!

Here's the FF's engine bay before degreasing. This is a very low resolution picture from the ad for the car:


And here's the bay after degreasing, but not detailed (shiny-stuff not applied):


Now getting to work toward removing the head to see what's the damage. Battery, etc., on right is already out:


Here's with the right/top engine mount removed, and the timing belt and top sprocket exposed:


With the thermostat and EGR off of the left side of the engine, the two black shifter cables are exposed. The one passing closest to the EGR was frayed/damaged from heat and rubbing, so the cables had to come out. But here the damage is wrapped in shiny metal duct tape to keep the frayed wires from stabbing me even more:


The valve cover off, and starting to go after the exhaust manifold. Nice and clean inside the top of the engine:


With the cylinder head off, the damage to the top of piston #3 is very apparent:


And here's a close-up of #2 as compared to #3. Note the heavy, oily carboning on the pistons:



The damage to the cylinder head, over #3, is dramatic. The dropped seat is not easy to see -- you have to look very closely on the head itself to see that an intake seat is completely gone:


Here's all the valve gear (cam, lifters, rockers, sprocket, etc.) removed from the old head. All was in good condition, and was reused on the remanufactured "valves only" head bought off eBay:


With the severe damage to #3 piston seen, but the cylinder bore looking good, the final, fateful decision was made to yank the block and rebuild, instead of the other, varied options. Here's starting to remove stuff from around the block; note the rag for keeping crud out of the cylinders:


Removing the starter, intake manifold, and all the other stuff from the backside of the engine, and from underneath the back, was the most painful. And still the oil dipstick tube wouldn't budge:


With the early decision to pull the engine from above, rather than below, it was obvious that clearance on the front of the engine was going to be critical. Here, the water pump's sprocket is shown to be very close to the right frame rail:


Hooking up the cherrypicker. Not too visible, but the hood is still, and stayed, installed and only propped-up by the factory rod:


From the other angle. The 2x4 was there to protect the block's top and the cylinders from the hoist, chain, etc.:


The water pump came off, and the accessory bracket disconnected, from the block to give more clearance on the engine's front. Raising and lowering the block, with the floor jack under the oil pan (with wide, soft block of wood between the jack's cradle and the pan), was used throughout to gain clearance of the crank, etc.:


And the visual story will continue, via many more pics, as I get them uploaded and by the moderator! (Just don't look at the pics upsidedown, or the evil subliminal messages will be revealed!)
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Old 01-15-2012, 02:15 PM   #115
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Cool A few more

Here's the Intake Manifold Runner Control (IMRC) assembly that came out from between the intake manifold and the head:


You can read about the resto of the IMRC in a separate how-to thread, previously mentioned:

http://www.focusfanatics.com/forum/showthread.php?t=276543

At one point, I was waiting for some more parts to arrive, so one thing I got done was cleaning up the trunk including installing two new lift cylinders:



Here's the spark plugs that came out of the SPI. #1 is on the left. #3's spark plug wasn't mashed, but was a slightly different color. The engine was still running, fairly smoothly except for the varying racket.
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Old 01-16-2012, 12:38 PM   #116
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Thumbs up Yankin' it out

Here's the cat, with the "interesting" bracket sitting on it. The bracket has the two lower bellhousing bolts going through it. The cat clamp on it too was rusty, but still serviceable. You might need to replace yours. Getting the cat-to-flex pipe bolts, from under the car without a lift, isn't fun. Be Liquid Wrenching them for a couple days beforehand. I didn't find any valve seat pieces in the cat:


For separating the engine from the trans, with both still in the car, the trans needs to be supported separately, and level with the engine. This was my quick but ugly solution -- a bottle jack and a block of wood. Jacks are only meant for lifting/lowering, and not long-term supporting, but the engine crane's legs were in the way and I was moving fast. Don't do this at home!


Here's the between the engine and the radiator, with everything out or tied away. That lowest bellhousing bolt was corroded, so shoot some WD-40 in from the right as early as possible, and work the bolt in and out slowly.


The bolts from the top of the bellhousing were easy, once all the other parts were out:


With the trans bolts out, and carefully applied force, the engine separates. If you have an automatic, remember to unbolt the torque converter first! It should never be pulled with the engine, lest you damage its input nipple and/or the front pump's shaft or bearing. Not to mention all the fluid pouring out. Note here that as soon as the clutch was off the manual trans' input shaft, the turning of the engine was needed to gain clearance on the front.


Here's that front end, and the right frame rail. I had to lower the engine to get the crank below the rail, to allow continuing to turn the engine. And was very carefully moving the fuel rail, etc. out of the way on top.


With the engine turned about 40 degrees, I could slowly lift the engine, again watching for/moving things on the front and back of the engine:


Once clear, it was up, up, and away with the engine!


Keeping the sling short allowed lifting the engine over the front of the car, with the hood still installed. Those two (not reused) head bolts have long sleeves and heavy washers on the to shorted the moment-arm put on the block -- read more about it in the prior text in this thread.

And here's the inside of the bellhousing, after the engine was out. Inspect then clean it, though watch out for really sharp edges and flash metal. This throwout bearing was getting sloppy. The on the lower-left wasn't from the trans' front seal, so most likely was from the rear seal of the engine. Not bad for 132K miles.
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Old 01-17-2012, 11:56 AM   #117
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Thanks for posting up the pictures.

Question, what kind of degreaser and brush did you use on your engine bay? I've tried to use purple power before but didnt get great results?
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Old 01-17-2012, 04:25 PM   #118
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Simple Green, but it does haze aluminum, so don't do your Ferrari with it.
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Old 01-19-2012, 08:47 PM   #119
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Question The last pics?

Well, there's another limit -- only 60 pics max across all your albums here on the site, but the admin says can upload others to the Gallery. I don't have time, and may never ... but who knows, maybe I'll need to redo the FF in a decade or so?

So, for now, this is it. Yes, there's lots more really good pics that will have to wait, maybe for eternity.

Here's the engine bay with ... wait for it ... no engine! So now is an engineless bay? This would have been a great time to clean it, but naaaa! Did flush the heater core though, as described in the earlier pages:


With the engine still on the crane, but carefully lowered to the floor, the clutch can come off. It still had a little friction material to go, but heck, you're this deep in, might as well replace it:


The flywheel is next, but since the bolts are very tight and the crank wants to turn, a HD impact wrench was best. But later, when reinstalling, I used a flywheel turner to hold it still while retorquing the bolts. I should have removed the thin blockoff plate from the block at this point, but was too eager to get inside the block:


Here's the block on the stand, ready to flip to rip open its guts. Use very high strength bolts, nuts, and washers to mount the engine to the stand's head, lest you loose your toes:


With the block flipped, and the oil pan off, the unseen from above major damage became apparent. A big hint was metal sounds from inside as the block was turned over on the stand. Read the preceding pages for more description of the extensive damage to #3 piston's skirts:


But here's a pic. It just dropped out of the engine after unbolting the rod. Normally you have to ease them out:


After completely disassembling the block, it got a good scrub down, careful inspection, and the cylinders were honed:


Some more cleaning, and drying, and then it was time for the engine enamel:


Reassembly underway, the reman crank going in. Note all the balancing holes drilled in the counterweights by the machine shops:


Here's the new pistons on the three old and one reman rod, kept in proper order. New rings' too -- they must go on in a very specific way. The pic shows the ring expander pliers and the band-type compressor. Everything must be super-clean!


And you have to do all the careful checks, like the bearings' clearances (w/Plastigauge) and the end gaps of all the rings:


Putting the rear main seal back on wasn't going to happen on the stand, so had to put the short block back down on the floor, but this time inverted and on a very clean towel. This position worked well for putting the oil pump and pan, flywheel, and clutch back on too, but then flipping it back over, on the floor, was not the most beautiful move:


Here's the completed short block back on the crane, via a load-leveler, which is a must. Don't even try to reinstall without, unless you really like to cuss. The text describes how I aligned and pushed together the block and bellhousing, after doing the reverse of the removal to get the block nearly back in place:


Here's the IMRC going back in, via bolting up the intake manifold. Note the clean rags to keep dust, tools, small children, falling Russian spacecraft debris, etc. out of the engine:


Jumping ahead, here's the almost complete reinstall. Ooooo ... nice clean air filter. But just one problem left:


And that was the incomplete new lower battery box that Ford and/or fastoemparts.com sold me. Here it is sitting in place:


But what not easily seen in the following, of the old one, are the missing parts that were shown in the Ford parts diagram: the hold-down strap as well as the metal brace that goes across the bottom and then left/up to the bolt hole. This missing metal brace is what actually supports the battery -- that plastic box would have cracked and allowed the battery to drop. A very dangerous and high liability situation -- shame on you guys! Does the CEO and head of your parts division know about this? They should, since I reported it in writing to the dealer, fastoemparts in WI. They wouldn't withhold critical quality control info from Ford, would they? But fastoemparts did say they talked to higher-ups, who said those parts weren't included because the plastic clamp was improved. Hogwash -- they are exactly the same on the old and new trays.


And here's the completed engine, brought back from the great beyond, found by the roadside dead. Purring away today:


There's lots more in-between pics of the rebuild, etc., but for at least now, that's all folks!

Thanks for reading and viewing. Good luck with your SPIs! I wouldn't recommend that others attempt this rebuild on their own, unless ...
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Old 01-30-2012, 12:39 PM   #120
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Great thread, awesome information and well researched!! awesome work LugNut!!!

If only i had stumbled upon this thread while i was rebuilding my SPI... it would have helped me greatly with the rebuild process!
The irony is that mine went late November due to the lower radiator hose leaking, draining the coolant completely, then the car overheating and the head warping and cracking. then subsequently the valve dropped.
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