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Old 05-14-2010, 12:36 PM   #191
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If you've got good access from the inside of the block as it appears in the last photo, yes, cut it off inside the block, particularly if you don't want to damage the rig pin seat. Use paper towels/rags to keep the swarf from going all over the place as much as possible. The remaining swarf can be cleaned out out later. Even if you can get down flush with the inside face of the block, the pin may still be hard to rotate......but you'll find out I guess. A few thou "below flush" could help......but just get as close to flush as you can first, and then try it. Just be careful, do not nick/gouge the crankshaft or the girdle etc. If push comes to shove, the remaining chunk of the pin could be left in the block.
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Old 05-14-2010, 02:37 PM   #192
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grumpy View Post
If you've got good access from the inside of the block as it appears in the last photo, yes, cut it off inside the block, particularly if you don't want to damage the rig pin seat.
OK


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Use paper towels/rags to keep the swarf from going all over the place as much as possible. The remaining swarf can be cleaned out out later.
...damn forgot about the 'towels'!

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Originally Posted by Grumpy View Post
Even if you can get down flush with the inside face of the block, the pin may still be hard to rotate......but you'll find out I guess. A few thou "below flush" could help......but just get as close to flush as you can first, and then try it.
I cut the main part away first, then ground down the stub so that it was slightly concave [i.e. like an inside out blister]. I had to turn the head of the locking pin with the vice grip pliers several times in short 1/8th. movements whilst lubricating; after 2-3 full turns it became loose enough to rotate by hand. Was a lot of resistance to start with but soon freed up!

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Just be careful, do not nick/gouge the crankshaft or the girdle etc. If push comes to shove, the remaining chunk of the pin could be left in the block.
I did slightly/negligibly 'nick' the girdle and inside face of the block around the hole, but I can't see that as being a problem as those surfaces don't play a part in the engine rotation cycle?

"The plug" now inserts fine, as does the timing pin and the crank fully rotates right round with only the expected mechanical resistance.

I have spray engine cleaner [gunk] and engine [oil] flush fluid; also alcohol based electrical component cleaner that immediately evaporates. What is best to get rid of the swarf [iron filings] ~ what would you suggest please?





Looking straight up into the block from below:


I put the timing pin back in and rotated the crank until it gently came up against the counterweight. [The screwdriver in cylinder 1 is at it's highest point]. There is some rotational latency/dwell (at TDC).

First piston counterweights at TDC position?


These marks are lined up, presumably for TDC? [ON - "P1"]



Cam Timing Diagram [not to scale]:

KEY:
dotted black line/black line = cam end SLOTS, [for 'bar' to enter].
circular black = camshaft ends.
blue = cylinder head.
red = timing bar.



This is a representation of how mine is currently positioned!

cheers!

Last edited by the_doc735; 05-14-2010 at 03:38 PM.
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Old 05-14-2010, 05:32 PM   #193
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The incidental nicks at the pin hole.......I would leave them alone. How about a photo of the nicks in the girdle.....some blending/polishing might be in order. The swarf can be removed as you've alluded to by just using a light oil spray (WD40 maybe) and letting it drain into a pan, plus hand wiping. I don't like Gunk Engine cleaner (if that's the Gunk that I'm thinking of). Don't flood any of the bearings if you can help it, although squirting oil at the bearings and letting it capillary in can be done before you install the oil pan. That triangular arrow is only on that one bearing cap? Don't worry about the camshaft location right now and leave the camshafts timing plate off right now. The crankshaft oil seal shows no signs of leaking? Do you have the replacement pulley bolt and washer? I believe that this could be a good time to install the crankshaft drive sprocket (loop the new belt under the sprocket if you can't get it positioned in there afterwards), the crankshaft pulley, and accomplishing the torquing of the bolt. Or is there a plastic guard that has to go on first? Other than some oil on the threads of the bolt and a thin layer of grease under the head of the bolt, everything else (the crankshaft, the sprocket and the pulley) MUST be clean and dry. Next...... you've got to come up with a way to hold the crank solidly while torquing the pulley bolt. You do now have the crankshaft exposed.......any way to use a "wedge/shim" for countertorque? Or......are you sure that the "flywheel" lock that you obtained won't fit. This shouldn't be anything as bad as the loosening torque. Both front wheels (chocked/blocked at the front), on the ground in 5th gear, could help, but it still won't be solid.
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Old 05-15-2010, 01:14 PM   #194
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Quote:
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The incidental nicks at the pin hole.......I would leave them alone.
OK

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How about a photo of the nicks in the girdle.....some blending/polishing might be in order.
Unfortunately, I can't get a camera angle of the negligible scuffs on the upper side of the girdle without removing it: [i.e. camera's too big to fit in there!]


...why does it need blending ~ what's the significance?

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The swarf can be removed as you've alluded to by just using a light oil spray (WD40 maybe) and letting it drain into a pan, plus hand wiping. I don't like Gunk Engine cleaner (if that's the Gunk that I'm thinking of). Don't flood any of the bearings if you can help it, although squirting oil at the bearings and letting it capillary in can be done before you install the oil pan.
I'll phone round on monday [after weekend] to see what I can obtain in the way of light oil, [to clean the swarf up].

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That triangular arrow is only on that one bearing cap?
no.

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Don't worry about the camshaft location right now and leave the camshafts timing plate off right now. The crankshaft oil seal shows no signs of leaking?
no leaking.

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Do you have the replacement pulley bolt and washer?
yes - it's all in one piece - not separate. I got 2 - [just incase]. I also got the black sump sealant in a tube.

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I believe that this could be a good time to install the: crankshaft drive sprocket, new belt, plastic guard & crankshaft pulley; and accomplishing the torquing of the bolt.
I can't keep the crankshaft still to torque it up!?!?


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Or is there a plastic guard that has to go on first?
yes.~ I'll remember that too!! [important].

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Other than some oil on the threads of the bolt and a thin layer of grease under the head of the bolt, everything else (the crankshaft, the sprocket and the pulley) MUST be clean and dry.
OK

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Next...... you've got to come up with a way to hold the crank solidly while torquing the pulley bolt.
?

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You do now have the crankshaft exposed.......any way to use a "wedge/shim" for countertorque?
...erm, don't know? [don't want to breaking anything off!]

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Or......are you sure that the "flywheel" lock that you obtained won't fit.
Can't be absolutely certain without extracting the starter first; all I know is that it isn't mentioned on the packet of recommended applications for that particular tool ~ except to say that other engine codes require a LOCKING PIN instead [which I have recently cut out due to bending!].

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This shouldn't be anything as bad as the loosening torque.
...glad to hear it -haha!

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Both front wheels (chocked/blocked at the front), on the ground in 5th gear, could help, but it still won't be solid.
OK.

Cheers!

Last edited by the_doc735; 05-15-2010 at 03:52 PM.
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Old 05-15-2010, 04:15 PM   #195
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UPDATE:

...removed starter motor.

Positioned crankshaft/flywheel LOCKING tool through starter hole.

Need to buy some nuts as there is none with the kit - to hold the tool in place using the starter bolts [on Monday].

The part of the tool that fits between the teeth of the flywheel DOES seem to engage with the teeth, however it doesn't feel like a 'good purchase' to me; feels a bit flimsy somehow! But now I am of course paranoid after what happened with the LOCKING PIN/CRANK PULLEY TORQUE RELEASE.

In a nutshell, I feel that applying the torque to the new bolt will break the teeth of the flywheel or is it all just in my own imagination??? My confidence is 'down', in this respect!!

Cheers!

Last edited by the_doc735; 05-15-2010 at 05:42 PM.
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Old 05-15-2010, 10:57 PM   #196
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The girdle is probably not really stressed that much......so it's probably better just to leave it if you can't really see the damage, or access it. It's just that on highly stressed parts/components sharp nicks and gouges can concentrate stresses and cause cracking/breakage. It looks like getting all the swarf from the upper surface areas of the girdle might require some soaking up the fluids and swarf with towels etc. The triangular mark on the bearing caps I believe are just orientation marks (faces front.....faces to the rear, sort of thing). They are very often numbered. The timing pin is still useable.....correct (the flaking isn't right on the tip from what I saw in the photo), and I don't believe the crankshaft machined flat is really damaged, (although you can visually check that), so it should still be useable to determine TDC when the time comes to time the crank with the camshafts. The belt tensioner is "relaxed", correct? The pulley bolt torque is a maximum of 130 ft/lbs didn't you say? That's not too bad......I think that the starter ring gear and the tool should be able to handle that. You won't be using an impact wrench or a six foot bar......just a torque wrench. It's also possible that the bolt will have to loosened and the sprocket rotated on the crank a little bit, and then the bolt retorqed. How about a photo of the new bolt/washer.
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Old 05-16-2010, 01:50 PM   #197
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Quote:
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on highly stressed components sharp nicks and gouges can concentrate stresses and cause cracking/breakage.
I see ~ I am pretty certain that there are no sharp nicks and gouges. Light surface scuffing only.

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It looks like getting all the swarf from the upper surface areas of the girdle might require some soaking up the fluids and swarf with towels etc.
I got this, which evaporates fairly quickly, but would remain solvent long enough to remove the swarf:


Quote:
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The triangular mark on the bearing caps I believe are just orientation marks (faces front.....faces to the rear, sort of thing). They are very often numbered.
OK ~ I see.


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The timing pin is still useable.....correct? (the flaking isn't right on the tip from what I saw in the photo), and I don't believe the crankshaft machined flat is really damaged, (although you can visually check that), so it should still be useable to determine TDC when the time comes to time the crank with the camshafts.
The timing pin is fine, not damaged at all:

The locking pin is now un-useable as it was cut out of the block due to bending:


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The belt tensioner is "relaxed", correct?
..erm ...yes!


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The pulley bolt torque is a maximum of 130 ft/lbs didn't you say? That's not too bad......I think that the starter ring gear and the tool should be able to handle that.
Yes I did hear that from someone on another forum; BUT "the haynes" [manual] says: 30 Lbs./Ft. + 90 angle. Who to trust?

Managed to get hold of some 'M10' nuts & washers for use with 2 of the starter bolts [diagonally mounted across 'the opening'].





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You won't be using an impact wrench or a six foot bar......just a torque wrench.
Correct.

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It's also possible that the bolt will have to loosened and the sprocket rotated on the crank a little bit, and then the bolt retorqed.
Oh! ~ I thought the threads were stretched during torquing so that it is only possible to tighten the bolt ONCE?

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How about a photo of the new bolt/washer.




Remember that I put the engine mount back on so that I could take the sump off, obviously to fit the belt over the cams I need to remove the engine mount again - but now that the sump is off I can no longer support the engine from underneath with a jack and wooden platform resting against the sump bottom i.e. the engine would be resting on the internal components at the bottom of the block instead of the [removed] sump!

Cheers!
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Old 05-16-2010, 02:25 PM   #198
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"Setting" torque plus a degree turn is often spec'd to get a precise final torque value - avoids variation between torque wrenches, lubrication levels so can be more accurate - use this method when specified.

Leaving most replies to Grumpy, just thought I'd toss in this tidbit for ya!
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Old 05-16-2010, 06:29 PM   #199
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"Setting" torque plus a degree turn is often spec'd to get a precise final torque value - avoids variation between torque wrenches, lubrication levels so can be more accurate - use this method when specified.

Leaving most replies to Grumpy, just thought I'd toss in this tidbit for ya!
CHEERS MATE!!

...do you store a torque wrench standing up on it's handle or it's head?
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Old 05-16-2010, 08:10 PM   #200
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Posted via FF Mobile Flat in it`s case if you want a "serious" answer (grin) Beam type needs no recalibration, but more skill in use - my "click" types get light use, so I`ve never had them checked/calibrated. That`s more for ones in daily production line use anyways... Never heard of issues with good ones that weren`t abused. Angle torque (snug then turn specified degrees) is getting more common, as definitions of "lube" and lube used varies, even "dry" varies with some corrosion. Industrial is often spec`d lubed with anti seize compound, and I bet this is more info than you wanted!! Feel like standing on MY head to access some things on these cars, so the wrench has to fend for itself! (grin) Cheers Mate!
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