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View Poll Results: Good Idea??
Yes 2 33.33%
No 3 50.00%
Yes, but i must add something to this 1 16.67%
Voters: 6. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
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Old 11-14-2005, 09:51 PM   #1
S1lkwrm
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Join Date: Aug 2004
Fan#: 11458
Location: South Korea & Florida
What I Drive: 2000 ZX3

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Passive rear steer revisited

Ok after messing with this online game called "live for speed" more specific the rear toe settings on the car I came up with what seems to be a brilliant idea (Mabye).

when tunning the rear of a car to rotate we generally sacrifice the independent suspension by upping the stiffness of the rear bar or reducing the front bar. then mabye some tire pressure. Why not play onto the rear steering of our car? Its been overlooked as far as I know.


Assumptions:
- Going straight rear tires point foward for most part.

- turn left and the suspension rolls right and rear right tire toes out and I think rear left toes in causing the rear steer.

- this could be tuned by replacing the arm or what ever it is that bends, flexes, or acts lever.

- more turn in could be had.

- better rotation could be had (rear will track aroujnd the turn vice drag ala large swaybar)

- as you let off the turn the body will start to go back to center as will the toe I think this may alow for you to get on the gas sooner as the rear is actually not breaking traction and you dont have to wait for traction to catch up.

- A non passive rear steer car with alot of rear toe out will be really tail happy and less effective as both tires are pointed outward and your scrubbing speed and eating tire even when going straight.

-Passive rear stear guides the rear based on whatever bends, flexes, or acts as a lever and by the body roll.

Assumed Aplication:
- make for a much better slip angle when tuned with your current suspension, almost feel like your drifting the corner but actualy are turning around the turn but have enuf stiffness to set you center quickly in transitions.

- on a stiff track car I assume you loose a good bit of (PRS) since your roll is reduced you can up the effect on whatever bends, flexes, or acts lever to regain some of this.

** heres an analogy for over clockers of the AMD type all others skip this:

Body roll = MGHZ (bus speed)
bends, flexes, or acts lever suspension part = CPU multiplier
CPU mghz = amount or rear steer

if you lower your mghz you can up the multiplier to regain some cpu power.
so
if you reduce body roll you can up the part that bends, flexes, or acts lever to get more (PRS)
[:)][:)][:)][:)][:)][:)]end of wierd analogy [:)][:)][:)][:)][:)][:)]

to summarize I really think this is a part of our suspension we have really been over looking.


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