2012 Titanium Front Strut Low Speed Noise (Clunk/Rattle) - Page 206 - Focus Fanatics
Ford Focus Forum
HomeContact UsAbout UsGalleryDiscussion ForumsMarketplace



Go Back   Focus Fanatics > Ford Focus Third Generation > MK3 TSB, Recall & Problems Archive

MK3 TSB, Recall & Problems Archive The place to chat about TSB and Known Issues for the 2012 Focus.

Search This Forum | Image Search | Advanced Search    
FocusFest Ford Focus Tire & Wheels FocusFanatics Merchandise

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-24-2013, 11:07 PM   #2051
BlazeFocus
Focus Enthusiast
 
BlazeFocus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Fan#: 104991
Location: _, UT
What I Drive: _

Posts: 149
FF Reputation: 2 BlazeFocus Good Standing Member
Buy-Sell-Trade Rating: (0)
Fixed ! ! ! !

So here's the wrap:

Bought my Ti August 2012. It developed this noise in October, somewhere in the neighborhood of 2200 miles. It was intermittent, over speed bumps and through the neighborhood at speeds at or below 25 MPH. In my car, when I turned to the right at these low speeds, it would make a low-grade noise that was confusing - more of a rattle, somewhat clunky - but definitely coming from the drivers side. Didn't matter if the pavement was smooth or not; certainly rough pavement at low speeds would trigger the noise but on my neighborhood streets that are nice and smooth it would happen too - which to me was sort of weird. It is like very small displacements coupled with frictions between the shaft and the ID of the bump-stop is the mode - frequency dependent to be sure. I initially thought it was temp related but as the months wore on, it was more frequent and occurring regardless of temps - and still intermittent. Maybe moisture was a factor in quieting it down, dunno. Nonetheless it drove me nuts. Something I was able to pin down only recently is that at slow speeds (in the neighborhood and while making easy right turns) it could be induced with very light taps on the brakes.

So anyway, I did the deal this morning. Used the mixing syringe recommended by Dysan and used the red Mobil 1 syn-grease. I figured what the hey - try this low cost attempt at a fix - some 12 bucks invested plus a half-hour of time - before I threw down the gauntlet and started to get into it with my dealership which I wasn't much looking forward to doing.

The procedure was easy. My bump-stop didn't rotate freely as others have reported. Like Dysan, I manipulated the bump-stop (pre-treatment) to check the noise inside and outside of the car. It sounded like it was the source. For me, I injected the syn-grease twice. I estimate I was able to penetrate the bump-stop with between 3/4 & a little over an inch of the flexible tube. What I did notice is that if you cram too much of the tube up from the bottom, you will restrict the tube opening, thereby forcing the tube to come off the syringe when injecting the grease. So I backed off about a half inch or so. I only mention this because it can prevent others from making a mess when the extension tube separates from the syringe when applying pressure. In any event, I performed the procedure twice; did it once, emptying about 1/3 of the grease. (For the record, I was able to fill the syringe about half way using popsicle sticks.) So I did it once, rotated the bump-stop 180 degrees and did it again; applying 1/2 of the remaining contents this time. I stopped both times right when I saw a little of the grease begin to ooze out from the bottom of the bump-stop. Using the red syn-grease made this easy to observe. Once I completed the second application, I rotated the bump-stop another 180 degrees. It was moving more freely now..

To prove out the fix, we went on an extended road trip this afternoon, some 150 miles. Frequent stops and delays between different activities were necessary because as I've mentioned before, my situation has been intermittent. My car would sometimes rattle like crazy, I could park and go into a mall and when I returned to my car and drove off, the sound would stop - sometimes for the remainder of the day - sometimes it would come back. I'm happy to report to that in 70 degree weather, with many start/stops, my left strut assembly is now consistently dead quiet.

So here's my take; because of the amount of grease accepted, I believe there are larger voids inside this bump-stop and the grease not only lubes the interface points between it and the shaft but it also adds mass thereby eliminating any diaphragm/bell effect. Here's something also worth noting. Before remounting my tire and after I cleaned up the residuals, I tapped on the bump-stop and the response noise originally present (pre-treatment) was now completely gone. In other words, the sound that emanates from the bump-stop after being treated with grease (in this fashion) equals no sound at all. That alone tipped me off that this fix was going to be successful since the audible response from tapping on the bump-stop went from sounding sort of hollow to dead solid silent. This leads me to believe that that the nature of this sound was a combination of intermittent interference between the ID of the bump-stop and the shaft & a bell effect. I believe that other "clunks" are more hard & fast chassis/suspension related but mine was strictly this damned bump-stop. If my right side develops this sound over time, I now know I have a quick path to tackling it before making a service visit nightmare out of it - and being told (as is commonly the case) that "it is normal. live with it" - which is utter BS. A bump-stop cut in half, revealing the inner geometry, would go along way in revealing more about his issue.

One last tip: The dust boot doesn't have the best interlocking strategy one might expect. Don't fret; it's that way for a reason. In a normally strut-compressed position, the dust boot will remain secure at the top and bottom. But you will notice after pulling it down & away (while you're doing the grease treatment) that it will fight you a little when you attempt to re-fasten it at the top & bottom when you are finished. What I did was to work the boot to a more stretched condition and carefully snapped it in on the top first, then focused on the bottom while grasping the top to keep it in place. It takes some practice and again, it will fight you. Don't get frustrated. Once you think you've got it situated (and with the wheel back on), lower the car about half-way and stop, and re-check the seating of the top and bottom mating points of the dust boot. It will better comply (cooperate) to small adjustments in seating with a shorter strut extension and there will still be plenty of room to work with it before you completely drop the car down off the jack.

I drove enough in many situations today, over bumps at low speed and through many purposeful right-hand turns at low speed to test out the result.
My car is now dead quiet. The only thing I see that could possibly happen is if another inner "area" of the bump-stop, not touched by grease, develops
similar interference over time. We'll have to wait and see how this proves out...

Let me know if there are any questions.

Hat's off to Dysan for finding this solution!
It may not work for everyone but it absolutely worked for me.
That bump stop appears to have dimensional (ID) issues (variances) from the factory and this procedure provides a solid remedy if this is the source of your noise.
This whole experience initially defies intuition with regard to physics but it makes way more sense to me now, having seen the results..

Thanks again Dysan!

Last edited by BlazeFocus; 04-01-2013 at 12:49 PM.
BlazeFocus is offline  
    Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-25-2013, 06:40 AM   #2052
OPsDad
Focus Addict
 
OPsDad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Fan#: 108661
Location: Denham Springs, LA
What I Drive: 2014 Fusion Titanium AWD Moonroof

Posts: 727
FF Reputation: 2 OPsDad Good Standing Member
Buy-Sell-Trade Rating: (1)
I'm glad you found this fix, and I'll remember it's here should mine start making a noise. Thanks for posting it.
I wonder if one can take these to the dealership and have them grease the bump stop as a warranty issue (no cost to owner, I mean)...
__________________
SR #265 | "Quia currus certatus, inferius"
13 Focus Ti Sedan w/Handling Pkg, MFT Sony 10 NAV, Leather
13 Focus SE HB Sterling Grey, 201A, Leather
06 F350 6.0L DRW King Ranch, Sunroof, Rhino Bed Liner, 4" MBRP Turbo Back, AirRaid, Edge Chip w/Pyro
OPsDad is offline  
    Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-2013, 07:03 AM   #2053
Dysan911
Focus Addict
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Fan#: 95746
Location: Jacksonville, FL
What I Drive: 2012 White, Focus Titanium

Posts: 582
FF Reputation: 2 Dysan911 Good Standing Member
Buy-Sell-Trade Rating: (0)
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlazeFocus View Post

Hat's off to Dysan for finding this solution!
It may not work for everyone but it absolutely worked for me.
That bump stop appears to have dimensional (ID) issues (variances) from the factory and this provides a solid remedy if this is the source of your noise.
This whole experience defies intuition with regard to physics at the onset but it makes way more sense to me now, having seen the results..

Thanks again Dysan!
Blaze, I am so glad to hear this resolved your issue!. I was hoping the more that tried my fix with successful results the better confirmation we would have that this is in fact a solid resolution for this particular version of the clunk that a lot of us are having. So thank you for taking a stab at it and FWIW, I have YET to get any noise again and it's been over a month since I greased my bump stops. So far so good.

Thanks again for sharing your successful results and the level of detail you provided!. I know that will certainly help anyone else willing to give this a go.



B.
__________________
2012 FF Ti HB Platinum White Tricoat, Built 12/11, 401A + Parking Technology Package and MFT w/NAV at 3.5.1
Dysan911 is offline  
    Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-2013, 07:41 PM   #2054
Lipshurt
Focus Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Fan#: 92314
Location: Vista, CA
What I Drive: 2012 blue focus SE

Posts: 180
FF Reputation: 2 Lipshurt Good Standing Member
Buy-Sell-Trade Rating: (0)
Ok...so check this out
the grease did not do it for me, but dysab and blaze describe my sound exactly.
So today i had a brain storm involving filling the gap not with grease, but with velcro. i figured that velcro would be the right thickness, and would not shift around or thin out like grease might.

Today I pulled the wheel, and looked at the bump stop closely. it was off center with a gap on the side facing the wheel, and it touching facing away from the wheel. I made a piece of velcro about 2 inches by two inches but it had two long narrow pieces attached to the top and bottom (one piece of velcro cut to that shape).. The skinny parts made it easy to thread the whole piece into the bump stop, and then they attach to each other to hold it firmly in place. It went in there pretty easy, and it totally fill the gap. There is zero sound when you manipulate it or tap it etc.

I hesitate to say its fixed because many times just putting it on a lift would fix it temporarily. I drove around and it dead silent, and considering that when i pulled into the garage before the velcro, it was horrible, im pretty encouraged.

iI also noticed that there is a hard plastic ring in the top of the bump stop. the sound is most likely the hard plastic ring hitting the strut shaft. I threaded the strap between the ring and the shaft.

This makes a lot of things make sense:

1) the fact that the sound is intermitent, caused by the shifting of the bump stop
2) the bumpstop would take quite a while to heat up
3) sometimes going over some really horrible roads could make the sound stop...
4) sometimes going over really horrible roads could make the sound start...
5) many cars would not get the sound if the bump stop was fitted perfectly in the mount with lots of play all around the shaft
6) putting the car on a lift, would possibly shift the bump stop, quieting the sound. One time i thought i had fixed the sound after poking around and insulating things under there, only to have it return one month later when the tires were rotated.

so I guess we will see in a few days if this fixes it it. t seems a lot better than grease. actually a bit easier to do...
crossing my fingers for umpteenth time:)
Lipshurt is offline  
    Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-2013, 08:00 PM   #2055
SaToX
Focus Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Fan#: 94321
Location: Moncton, Canada
What I Drive: 2012 White Titanium Hatch

Posts: 124
FF Reputation: 4 SaToX Good Standing Member
Buy-Sell-Trade Rating: (0)
Cant wait to see the results!
SaToX is offline  
    Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-2013, 08:20 PM   #2056
jrn146
Focus Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Fan#: 275
Location: PA, United States
What I Drive: 2012 Candy Red SE 5 door 5 speed

Posts: 233
FF Reputation: 1 jrn146 Good Standing Member
Buy-Sell-Trade Rating: (0)
I tried some grease in mine last week while rotating the tires and it didn't help my noise but I don't think I put as much in as some of you. I used some white lithium grease just cause I had a tube. It didn't want to stay in the bump stop and kept coming out the bottom. I like the velcro idea but I'm having a hard time picturing what you did. Did you pull the stop down, put the velcro near the top, then snap the stop back up?
jrn146 is offline  
    Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-2013, 09:11 PM   #2057
BlazeFocus
Focus Enthusiast
 
BlazeFocus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Fan#: 104991
Location: _, UT
What I Drive: _

Posts: 149
FF Reputation: 2 BlazeFocus Good Standing Member
Buy-Sell-Trade Rating: (0)
The "suspension" or chassis grease I used is thick and is rated for really high temps. It is formulated to stay put like most standard, full-body grease compositions and they will not drip or thin out; they are super thick for a reason. White lithium grease - especially the stuff in a spray can - is a bad choice for this fix. I can't believe the lithium in tube is much better. The Mobil 1 I used would have to approach the top-end high-temp spec before it would start to migrate out; not likely, not even in desert heat.

Grease is used in many places on an automobile where dripping would be an issue. Coupling members in a moon-roof even have small dabs of grease and they don't drip..

From what I see, the grease method can only be successful if you 1) hit the critical point(s) of interference and 2) pack enough in there to fill the space thereby adding to the sound deadening side of the equation.

Anyone not having a successful swag at this the first time around should go back and take the time to add more grease as prescribed and work it around.
You have to make sure you increase the odds of hitting the contact points and a sure fire way to improve that result is to apply (inject) the grease twice at 180 degrees apart or perhaps even at every 90 degrees of rotation.
Once lubed, you need to rotate the entire bump-stop a few times to work it in. Conversely, it is conceivable that if your interference point of contact is high enough up the bump-stop, disassembly would be required.

All that said, I personally believe that enough has been discovered here that anyone wishing to have Ford do this under warranty should have more than enough reasonable evidence (presented) to make a case to have it done at Ford's expense. Seems to me that if the strut assembly were dropped, grease could be evenly applied throughout the aperture with the bump-stop off the shaft. Everyone is afforded warranty service during their first year/x number of miles for fitment and noise related issues...this is one of those circumstances. Just make sure to arrange a test drive when the noise can be duplicated, with you and a Ford service guy in the car together - otherwise you are apt to get the brush-off..

And by the way:

Day Two - temps in the 70's - absolutely no noise whatsoever..

Last edited by BlazeFocus; 02-26-2013 at 12:49 PM.
BlazeFocus is offline  
    Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2013, 08:42 PM   #2058
Uptcv1
Focus Enthusiast
 
Uptcv1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Fan#: 88390
Location: NJ, NJ
What I Drive: 2012 sonic blue SE sport DCT hatch

Posts: 265
FF Reputation: 1 Uptcv1 Good Standing Member
Buy-Sell-Trade Rating: (0)
Bump for Ford Co. Where is the TSB on this?
At least this one will not cost Ford (no parts..)
Uptcv1 is offline  
    Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2013, 09:37 PM   #2059
BlazeFocus
Focus Enthusiast
 
BlazeFocus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Fan#: 104991
Location: _, UT
What I Drive: _

Posts: 149
FF Reputation: 2 BlazeFocus Good Standing Member
Buy-Sell-Trade Rating: (0)
Third Day - in the seventies temp wise - no noise!
BlazeFocus is offline  
    Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2013, 10:23 PM   #2060
Lipshurt
Focus Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Fan#: 92314
Location: Vista, CA
What I Drive: 2012 blue focus SE

Posts: 180
FF Reputation: 2 Lipshurt Good Standing Member
Buy-Sell-Trade Rating: (0)
I'm pretty sure that within a couple days my rattle/clunk will be back. It started hinting in at it this afternoon, and tonight I heard it a couple times. It always goes like this.... Putting it on a lift fixes it for a certain amount of time, and when you hit a certain bump things shift into position where two parts are hitting each other. It gets worse and worse till you lift it to look at it...which fixes it for a bit. Very annoying.
Lipshurt is offline  
    Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks & Social Networks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:44 PM.


Copyright 2002-2014 FocusFanatics.com. All Rights Reserved : Terms of Use : Privacy Policy : Advertise Information : Site Map

Focus Fanatics Ford Focus Forum offers many fun ways for you to engage with other Ford Focus Owners from across the world. Whether it be about the aftermarket performance modifications, technical how-to's, European tuned suspension or awesome fuel economy similar to the Acura TLX or Fiesta ST. You can find all Ford Focus and Focus ST related information here. Join our Ford Focus discussion forums and chat with local Focus enthusiasts in your area.