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Old 08-11-2012, 11:20 PM   #1
reinhart0901
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Thinking of attempting Timing Belt Change

I was thinking of doing the timing belt change on 2001 2.0 sedan. What are your alls thoughts and pointers if you have them. Has 152,000 miles and has not been changed. Just bought the car and thought it would be good idea. Let me know thanks


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Old 08-12-2012, 12:20 AM   #2
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Everything you need to know. http://www.focusfanatics.com/forum/showthread.php?t=171242
The timing kit isn't really necessary unless your timing is off. You can mark the belt/pulleys with white out. I do one pulley tooth and two belt teeth. Transfer the marks to the new belt. Make sure you count the teeth on the belt between the marks 3 or 4 times to make sure you marked the new one right.
While you're in there replace the water pump, accessory belt and accessory belt tensioner/idler pulleys. You need to take all that stuff off anyways so might as well do it while you're doing the timing belt.
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Old 09-04-2012, 05:44 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xxMichaelAnthony View Post
Everything you need to know. http://www.focusfanatics.com/forum/showthread.php?t=171242
The timing kit isn't really necessary unless your timing is off. You can mark the belt/pulleys with white out. I do one pulley tooth and two belt teeth. Transfer the marks to the new belt. Make sure you count the teeth on the belt between the marks 3 or 4 times to make sure you marked the new one right.
While you're in there replace the water pump, accessory belt and accessory belt tensioner/idler pulleys. You need to take all that stuff off anyways so might as well do it while you're doing the timing belt.
Is this 'white marks' method an accurate explanation? I have to replace the timing belt on a 2002 wagon. It's still running, so I'd rather not buy more parts (in the kit) than I need to replace. Are there timing pullies I need to replace?

Also, how do I tell if my Zetec engine is an interference engine or not? And are all Zetecs DOHC?

The car has 156k miles on it. The water pump is fine, so (again) I don't want to replace things unnecessarily, but I don't mind replacing it if it's the best thing to do. I'm also planning to replace the serp belt & tension & idler pullies.

There are a LOT of different timing belts & kits on Rock Auto!!
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Old 09-04-2012, 06:33 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eiron View Post
Is this 'white marks' method an accurate explanation?
IMHO, no it's not.
People just don't realize how importiant accurate and repetable results are or the best ways to get those results.
I also don't have confidence in the crankshaft stop pin,,, in the past there have been known machining errors and there can be user error upon install.


Therefore I believe my method to be the best, but it does require specialized tools:

I use a "leak-down tester" to push cylinder #2 to Bottom Dead Center. This will push #1 to Top Dead Center.

Quick rundown of the process:

- Remove battery cables
- Remove spark plug wires
- Remove spark plugs
- Remove Accessory belt
- Rotate engine to near TDC #1
- Remove crank pulley
- Remove upper and lower timing covers
- Remove valve cover
- Loosen cam gear retaining bolts, do not use the cam lock bar there is a flat spot on the cams you can use a wrench on to hold them in place
- Loosen tensioner pulley
- Remove the cam gears
- Now you can remove the timing belt if you have skills; you'll have to twist it from teh bottom and get the belt to 1 side of the divide in the motor plate; if you can do this you won't have to remove the motor mount; can install it the same way but it will be tight fit

- Install the leak-down tester on cylinder #2
- Open the valve and let the air pressure push it to BDC, you may have to rotate the cams to prevent air leaks; zetec is non-interferance so don't worry about valve damage
- Close valve and remove gauge
- Rotate cams and instal lock bar
- Slip new belt down the motor plat and fit to crank gear
- Instal cam gears with bolts loose
- Slip belt over cam gears
- Tighten tensioner
- Tighten cam gear bolts, being sure to use a wrench to hold the cams
- Remove cam lock and reinstall in reverse

I have never had a problem doing a timing belt this way. The air pressure is the big change and takes and machining error or user error out of the equation. Loosening the cam bolts ensures that the crankshaft doesn't move; the slack in the belt is able to move through the cam gears.
Also there is nothing saying that the current timing belt was installed correct. This method will ensure that everything is correctly done.



Far as what parts you will need --> GATES Part # TCK294B is a good kit for the money. I wouldn't go for a cheaper kit simply due to the belt being thinner/weaker.
But IMHO, the Ford timing belt is the best belt money can buy. You may want to contact Tousley Ford and see what they can do far as a 'kit' cost. It will be more but it'll also be far better quality.
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Old 09-04-2012, 07:37 PM   #5
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I would not transfer marks to the new belt if that's what I read.

mark the gears the same way but mark on the engine in the same spot as well. mark the crank the same way. its a whole hell of a lot easier to mark gear and block position over counting teeth and is very accurate with no mistakes to be made as in counting.

works very well professionally, allows me to get more done and if it came in running it will come out running the same way. I don't see the point of having to reset the timing unless you suspect its off or if the belt went out. or if you're ocd, but I've seen it cause more trouble than it was worth.


go for the gates component kit (TCK# something) I would get the component kit because you don't want a bearing to seize and eat your belt. same with the water pump if its timing belt driven. BUT, it all depends on how tight your budget is and if you can afford to do the job again if the pump starts to grind or seizes up and eats the belt.

Zetec is non interference and IS the dohc engine. the spi is the sohc. if it asks for Vin info, yours is "3"
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Old 09-04-2012, 07:52 PM   #6
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Iminhell has probably timed his engine more times than I have fingers, but I think a timing tool kit is the simplest way to go for a novice. And when done properly the crank stop pin is probably dead nuts on within one or two thousandths of an inch, which really just translates to very minutely different overlap on the exhaust stroke. Probably not a big deal on a pokey stock '01 zetec.

I think you should get a timing tool kit (mine's from Massive) and a Haynes repair manual and just follow the instructions. The Gates kit Iminhell mentioned is totally acceptable, used it with 3 cars, including my own.

I'd never around with permanent markers/whiteout when doing something as essential as engine timing, it's simply half assed for very little time and money saved. My perspective about this comes from having an interference engine, it's made me paranoid.
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Old 09-04-2012, 08:11 PM   #7
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it is not half-assed... the first method mentioned I'm not very comfortable with. but if you make the marks directly across the crank and cam gears to the head/block, there is absolutely no reason to get the timing wrong unless you leave too much slack on one side before putting the tensioner on, but that is a different problem.

I will leave it at that though. there are some people that make book time and those that make well under it. using the same method I did a Honda in 45 minutes... book time 3 hours. never had an issue with my own marks. never trust someone else's. oh and never cut corners, that will come back to bite you. that's a bit out of the scope of the thread though.
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Old 09-04-2012, 08:38 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eiron View Post
The car has 156k miles on it. The water pump is fine, so (again) I don't want to replace things unnecessarily, but I don't mind replacing it if it's the best thing to do. I'm also planning to replace the serp belt & tension & idler pullies.

There are a LOT of different timing belts & kits on Rock Auto!!
Water pumps are always fine...until they're not. It's far more logical to replace everything while you have it apart. Odds are against you when you gamble that a water pump will last 300,000 miles instead of siezing & destroying your brand new timing belt.
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Old 09-04-2012, 09:12 PM   #9
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ive done timing belts on a couple of Honda's... but do have a question. the marks. would marking the tooth closest to pointing straight upwards on the cam gears be a good idea??
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Old 09-04-2012, 09:13 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikebontoft View Post
it is not half-assed... the first method mentioned I'm not very comfortable with. but if you make the marks directly across the crank and cam gears to the head/block, there is absolutely no reason to get the timing wrong unless you leave too much slack on one side before putting the tensioner on, but that is a different problem.

I will leave it at that though. there are some people that make book time and those that make well under it. using the same method I did a Honda in 45 minutes... book time 3 hours. never had an issue with my own marks. never trust someone else's. oh and never cut corners, that will come back to bite you. that's a bit out of the scope of the thread though.
For what it's worth, I was writing my response after you posted yours, I think you know your methods and I trust they work. I still think from the perspective of a novice who's doing this for the first time, timing tools and by the book instructions are the surefire way of getting it right. If he does this, he's not trying to beat flat rate time.
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