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Old 05-03-2010, 07:55 PM   #61
Grumpy
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I expect that you've already sorted this out, but if not.......if you're satisfied that this "locking" pin is the correct one then rotate the crankshaft to a location where you can install it (fully seat it) and then slowly rotate the crankshaft counterclockwise until the crankshaft contacts the pin. Just as a trial/test I would back out the pin while applying ccw force to the crankshaft and see how many turns out (or threads) it takes before the crankshaft clears the pin. Hopefully it'll take several turns before the crank clears the pin. You should not have the pin "hanging on" by only a thread or two. If you're satisfied, then seat the pin, snug it up, and rotate the crank CCW again until it hits the pin. Ensure that the crank is seated against the pin when you go to loosen the pulley bolt.
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Old 05-04-2010, 09:40 AM   #62
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grumpy View Post
I expect that you've already sorted this out, but if not.......if you're satisfied that this "locking" pin is the correct one then rotate the crankshaft to a location where you can install it (fully seat it) and then slowly rotate the crankshaft counterclockwise until the crankshaft contacts the pin. Just as a trial/test I would back out the pin while applying ccw force to the crankshaft and see how many turns out (or threads) it takes before the crankshaft clears the pin. Hopefully it'll take several turns before the crank clears the pin. You should not have the pin "hanging on" by only a thread or two. If you're satisfied, then seat the pin, snug it up, and rotate the crank CCW again until it hits the pin. Ensure that the crank is seated against the pin when you go to loosen the pulley bolt.
today I received the locking pin (by post). The shaft is exactly the same length as the timing pin but A LOT thicker with a longer thread.

The flywheel locking tool has a list on the back of the pack which states ALL suitable models of ford/focus engine; my engine code is NOT in the list, therefore I conclude that it is unsuitable for my engine?

So looking like it's going to be the pin for next attempt. A ford garage near me has the original ford OEM part/tool (which is the same as mine) and they say that they use it all the time for cracking off crankshaft pulley bolts ~ plus a large breaker bar that delivers obscene amounts of torque!!
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Old 05-04-2010, 11:47 AM   #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grumpy View Post
I expect that you've already sorted this out, but if not.......if you're satisfied that this "locking" pin is the correct one then rotate the crankshaft to a location where you can install it (fully seat it) and then slowly rotate the crankshaft counterclockwise until the crankshaft contacts the pin. Just as a trial/test I would back out the pin while applying ccw force to the crankshaft and see how many turns out (or threads) it takes before the crankshaft clears the pin. Hopefully it'll take several turns before the crank clears the pin. You should not have the pin "hanging on" by only a thread or two. If you're satisfied, then seat the pin, snug it up, and rotate the crank CCW again until it hits the pin. Ensure that the crank is seated against the pin when you go to loosen the pulley bolt.
the flywheel tool DOESN'T fit my engine.

the crank locking tool only screws FULLY IN when at TDC (not BDC). The crank only appears to catch about 2mm approximately of the tip of the tool when tightend up. I started with a reasonable length breaker bar to see what would happen. I got the crank placed firmly up against the locking tool and gradually applied the pressure. After a moment I was applying moderate pressure to the breaker handle and felt something give way? IT WASN'T THE BOLT!! I carefully removed the pin; it wasn't bent but it looks to me like the crankshaft sheered its way past the locking tool at the very edge/tip that was in contact with its surface? THE PIN WON'T SCREW FURTHER IN!

The pin will tighten up against other parts of the crankshaft, but not fully inserted - there is about 3 - 5 mm of thread still sticking out if I do that. But (if the crank is a smooth surface?) I can't see how that will stop the crankshaft from rotating once I get the breaker bar on the bolt head?

picture of damaged tool:
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Old 05-04-2010, 11:52 AM   #64
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Don't you hate it when a simple job turns episodic. Glad you found someone at a dealer that would talk to you. I'm not even doing the job and it gave me a headache. Just watch those knuckles! EDIT.......Damn just saw your latest post. If you look at the aformentioned photo of the timing pin installed and the crankshaft position with the #1 piston at TDC look at the position of the crankshaft web/counterweight of #2 cylinder which has the piston at BDC. It sure looks to me that with the piston just above BDC that if you intall the pin and then rotate the crank counterclockwise that the "large" part of the web/counterweight (rear) will come in contact with the installed pin. Don't you think? Seems to me that there has to be a location on the crank that'll come into solid contact with the pin.
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Old 05-04-2010, 12:11 PM   #65
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Don't you hate it when a simple job turns episodic. Glad you found someone at a dealer that would talk to you. I'm not even doing the job and it gave me a headache. Just watch those knuckles!
don't know what to do now. If I get a garage to crack it off I'll have to pay them + pay for a recovery truck to get it down there as well.



neighbours are gloating at the prospect of my failure!
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Old 05-04-2010, 12:16 PM   #66
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It just "ramped" off the machined flat. But I can't see how the opposite side of the crank web/counterweight as seen in the photo won't rotate around (when rotated CCW) and hit the damn pin? It just hit me........that the crank web/counterweight position will be about where the FRONT web/counterweight position of #2 cylinder is at BDC as in the photo (they alternate/are staggered between cylinders). Look at the position of the pin and compare it with how it looks in relation to the adjacent web/counterweight (the front one for #2 cyl. and just on the other side of the bearing) and you can see where the pin should/will contact the crankshaft. I appears that if you rotate the crank CW so that #1 piston is just above BDC, install the pin, rotate the crank CCW until it hits the pin. Back out the pin to see if you've got a good "purchase". Also......can you not see the crank through the bolt/pin hole and check to see what the end of the pin is actually contacting? There are so many Zetec engine varients on your side of the pond. DO NOT put the piston at TDC. Are you sure that the short pin is not the correct one?

Last edited by Grumpy; 05-04-2010 at 01:27 PM.
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Old 05-04-2010, 01:28 PM   #67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grumpy View Post
It just "ramped" off the machined flat. But I can't see how the opposite side of the crank web/counterweight as seen in the photo won't rotate around (when rotated CCW) and hit the damn pin? It just hit me........that the crank web/counterweight position will be about where the FRONT web/counterweight position of #2 cylinder is at BDC as in the photo (they alternate/are staggered between cylinders). Look at the position of the pin and compare it with how it looks in relation to the adjacent web/counterweight (the front one for #2 cyl. and just on the other side of the bearing) and you can see where the pin should/will contact the crankshaft. I appears that if you rotate the crank CW so that #1 piston is just above BDC, install the pin, rotate the crank CCW until it hits the pin. Back out the pin to see if you've got a good "purchase". Also......can you not see the crank through the bolt/pin hole and check to see what the end of the pin is actually contacting? There are so many Zetec engine varients on your side of the pond.


no I can't actually see in there at the mo, maybe with a torch and a mirror of some kind?

Whilst I was screwing the pin in and out (back and forth) it did hit "something?" at about the 9 o'clock and 3 o'clock positions (on the crankshaft pulley)? But after it gave way the first time I used the breaker bar I didn't pursue it any further; I didn't keep turning with the breaker bar any further to see what would happen next, I simply removed the pin and left it at that and came straight back to the forum with my new dilemma?

I DID put the piston at TDC!

The shop manager assured me that the locking pin carried the code of my engine BEFORE he broke that one item out of a complete ford timing kit (for all ford engines).

cheers!
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Old 05-04-2010, 04:09 PM   #68
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The flat area above your red arrow........just above the step. I believe that the pin should be only put under a compression load, not a shear load. You should be able to "feel" for that area by threading the pin out/in while rotating the crank back and forth when the piston is about at BDC. When you can locate/feel that step you want to have the pin fully seated/torqued so that the end of the pin hits that flat area just "above" the step. If you can feel the pin bending (not a nice solid feel) at any time when attempting to break the bolt free........stop.
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Old 05-04-2010, 05:35 PM   #69
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-You don't have an air compressor.
-You have an automatic transaxle or you don't have a way to put the transaxle in gear with the brake on to hold the crank from rotating.
-Your locking pin doesn't seem to be doing the trick.
-You don't want to tow the car to the garage.

Ok - how about locking up the piston in the cylinder, head still installed?:

- I read, someone here uses thin rope inserted into the spark plug hole to hold the valves in place when changing out the valve guides/seals. Insert rope on the compression stroke, rotate the crank until the piston stops. Undo the crank bolt, but without cracking the head.

OR -

- Again on the compression stroke, fill the cylinder with motor oil and rotate the crank until the piston stops. You should have enough time before oil bleeds past the rings. (What about the head gasket?)

I haven't figured out what the conversion is for 'PSI to ft-lbs' in a 1.6 liter engine. Assuming you could, but don't exceed the rated compression of your cylinder the 'oil method' would give you a better distribution of force across the cylinder. (Insert compression gauge in spark plug hole if uncertain )

It might be messier than the 'rope' but the 'oil' would eventually flow past the rings. It doesn't appear you are in a hurry. You might get a little smoke when you start it up - again, depending on how long you let the oil drain past the rings. Don't really want to blow it out the exhaust - unless the neighbors need to be shown a little respect !

Insert Legal disclaimer here.......

Nope - won't work, bolt isn't reverse threaded. ....... Ah - Bring the piston 'back' from the combustion stroke when filled with oil at BDC.

This is fun......
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60k+ miles.

Last edited by a_2000_se; 05-04-2010 at 05:40 PM. Reason: 'piston 'back' from the combustion stroke.
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Old 05-04-2010, 05:46 PM   #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grumpy View Post
The flat area above your red arrow........just above the step. I believe that the pin should be only put under a compression load, not a shear load. You should be able to "feel" for that area by threading the pin out/in while rotating the crank back and forth when the piston is about at BDC. When you can locate/feel that step you want to have the pin fully seated/torqued so that the end of the pin hits that flat area just "above" the step. If you can feel the pin bending (not a nice solid feel) at any time when attempting to break the bolt free........stop.
"a compression load, not a shear load"?

"you want to have the pin fully seated/torqued" ~ I can tighten this up but as I said before "the pin only fully inserts at TDC" i.e. when fully tightened at this position (the step) there WILL BE still about 3mm of thread showing outside the block! ~ OK?
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