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Old 10-28-2012, 06:10 PM   #26
amc49
Focus Fanatic
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Fan#: 96610
Location: Fort Worth, TX
What I Drive: 00 wagon, 02 sedan both zetec atx

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You can make your own scraper, I used to out of flat 1/16" sheet metal. Trapped it between oil pan and block on old school stuff, not hard to seal. The sealing surface on these zetecs could be problematic however (o-ring). Scraper does no good without receiver area for what you are scraping off.

Teflon coating is splitting atoms, much more important to put scraper edges within 1/8" of rotating parts meaning of course you pretty much have to custom fit it to your parts yourself. Every single one. Time intensive and exactly why he doesn't want to do it. Lotta work.

A 'windage' tray is kinda useless without the scraper, they work together, even more so if the tray is solid. Solid trays simply keep the windage trapped around the crank. That does nothing. Look at really good windage trays out there and see how many are all solid material. Most have some sort of screening to strip away the oil roping around the crank while not letting it come back up into the rotating mass.

Just like working on motor itself, the whole thing works together if looking for optimum result. Scraper, proper windage tray both screened and directional cutouts, pan kickout or relief room on pass side of motor (with even a custom trap wall to slow down air to allow dripdown on pan wall). We felt it was worth about 1/2 the power a dry sump added if the oil pan could be deep enough to help too.

Getting deep here in this tech is just like dry sumping, you are crossing reliability barriers. The stock trays on most motors are solid to keep them bottom dollar reliable for long periods of time. You get some of the power but not all that can be got. Obviously a screened part and scrapers potentially not as reliable for very long times, but they will make more power.

Not saying stock doesn't work or even work well, just not as good as a seriously thought out part as is usually the case in all things motor. Once you start zeroing in on pure unadulterated power you must give up things, reliability to an extent is one of them. If you're not racing for a living then simpler and stock is usually better.

Easy to see why stock pump goes to crap, the outside ring is unsupported it looks like across a pretty good chunk of its' OD on one side and two places. Any stackup looseness from normal clearances could allow center and outside rotors to get out of parallel with each other to chatter, that made worse by the center rotor simply slipping over crank snout, another clearance to add even more looseness. Pumps I earlier referred to as going much higher rpm always have a pressed in driveshaft to at least reduce looseness by one clearance or one third. They also fully support the outer ring all the way around both sides to hold the ring in dead parallel to the center. Full support on outer ring and inner too pretty much guarantees the pump cannot get up on the tip outside corners hard to chatter and break. Oil intaking and outputting will come in directly from the side instead of around the sides of the outer ring like this motor does.

Don't care too much for the flat cover over pump either, could suck air slightly at higher rpm even with the little pressure fed groove molded in there. I've seen that before on other motors. Also don't care for bypass output going back into intake path to disturb smooth flow into intake of pump. That alone at high rpm is asking for trouble to me. A good hi-perf pump bypasses outside and simply has bigger intake tube to make up for the supposed 'lost' volume.
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