Focus Fanatics

Focus Fanatics (http://www.focusfanatics.com/forum/index.php)
-   General Technical Chat (http://www.focusfanatics.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=47)
-   -   Anyone use this type of exhaust pipe coupler/clamp? (http://www.focusfanatics.com/forum/showthread.php?t=307015)

ChrisRobin 01-19-2013 04:46 PM

Anyone use this type of exhaust pipe coupler/clamp?
 
I'm looking to replace a straight section of my exhaust but I don't want to weld just yet. The exhaust I have now has 2.5" outer diameter tubing. I'll be joining 2.5" OD to 2.5" OD.

I figure with this and maybe some high-temp rtv, it would seal well and not move. Plus I have poly exhaust hangers so the exhaust will move very little.

http://static.summitracing.com/globa...ye-hvc65_w.jpg

whynotthinkwhynot 01-19-2013 06:37 PM

I've used those before- it will be ok as long as it's in a place where the pipe doesn't move much laterally. The good thing about that type of clamp is that it won't damage the pipe for welding later like the old style clamps will. It might slip out though.

whynotthinkwhynot 01-19-2013 06:40 PM

OH, don't use high temp RTV. Use muffler putty if anything, but I wouldn't even use that because it would cause more problems than it solves. Typically these companies test the product "dry". It doesn't need anything. Adding stuff will just cause problems that you can't envision right now. For example, foreign agents inside the clamp will push the pipe slightly, then decay, and now the clamp is loose.

goinloco1 01-19-2013 09:25 PM

oem is using them or flange clamps almost exclusively anymore where needed.
I've used them on many types of exhaust with no problem. they were actually designed for racing to allow proper joint alignment and clamping with no restrictions. Good luck trying to pull a pipe out of one if its properly torqued, not gonna happen without destroying alot of stuff.

ChrisRobin 01-19-2013 09:48 PM

Well good to know guys. Thanks. I'll confirm with Summitracing that this clamp is 2.5" INNER diameter to fit 2.5" OUTER diameter tubing.

Sent from my SGH-I317M using FF Mobile

amc49 01-21-2013 12:02 AM

Use antiseize liberally and it will disassemble easier in the future..........

goinloco1 01-21-2013 01:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by amc49 (Post 4549186)
Use antiseize liberally and it will disassemble easier in the future..........

on nothing more than the bolt threads.
These are a stainless steel friction fit exhaust coupler... you don't want anything anywhere that would cause them to slide.

sailor 01-21-2013 09:47 AM

A similar style has been std. for the 5" pipes on big rigs for years, seals up pretty well & holds fine. great to "butt join" same size pipe. Imagine having to "flare" pipe that large!

amc49 01-21-2013 07:43 PM

You gotta understand antisieze, it allows coupling tightness to cut through it, it is not meant to slide so much as come loose easier way on down the line. Use it as a grease for something that works a lot and like no grease at all in five minutes. Two different things. The exhaust heat will cook out the grease portion in maybe a day. Even if connector is stainless if the pipe is regular steel it can stick even though you'd think it wouldn't BTDT. I wouldn't hesitate to coat the whole ID.............having done it before. All the slipfit connections on every car I have are antisiezed when they come apart, not one has ever been a problem. If it slips then not tight enough............or sized wrong, that connectors' type of space take up has very little range, look at how much space between the bolt heads and nuts, not much clamping distance there.

goinloco1 01-22-2013 12:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by amc49 (Post 4550363)
You gotta understand antisieze, it allows coupling tightness to cut through it, it is not meant to slide so much as come loose easier way on down the line. Use it as a grease for something that works a lot and like no grease at all in five minutes. Two different things. The exhaust heat will cook out the grease portion in maybe a day. Even if connector is stainless if the pipe is regular steel it can stick even though you'd think it wouldn't BTDT. I wouldn't hesitate to coat the whole ID.............having done it before. All the slipfit connections on every car I have are antisiezed when they come apart, not one has ever been a problem. If it slips then not tight enough............or sized wrong, that connectors' type of space take up has very little range, look at how much space between the bolt heads and nuts, not much clamping distance there.

you have to understand stainless evidently and I'm not an 18 year old like you seem to think.
Old racers trick... drop of oil on the inside surface spread very thinly with the finger to allow the surfaces to slide when tightened. run vehicle to operating temp and re-tighten if necessary.
Anti-seize has a problem in this app...to much of a chance for leaks, you have to constantly retighten or reset components, and you want metal to metal for friction, no buffer.
Even manufacturers install says to just install them... nothing more.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:23 AM.


http://www.focusfanatics.com/aboutus/copyright.asp