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Thread: Coil continuity test = no beep. Should I have a beep? (with picture) Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
05-10-2013 11:13 PM
amc49 Yup............
05-10-2013 10:04 PM
mikebontoft yeah no you're fine... I just wanted to bitch about SOMETHING today. lol
05-10-2013 09:09 PM
amc49 Understood and agreed.

What was highlighted as pertinent said coil.

I removed the 'read' line aforehand, not necessary for me to say that, but apparently not fast enough. My apologies.
05-10-2013 08:28 PM
mikebontoft I'm not talking about the coil, I'm talking about the harness... as related to the original post. the outer two should not have continuity if the connector is unplugged. The computer grounds each side separately. the coil WILL as you have mentioned. I can read diagrams just fine.
05-10-2013 08:21 PM
amc49 Uh, no. Middle is power in, it goes out to either side, the primary pairs. Connecting through in any combination should register very low there. Middle through either side is one primary worth of resistance, two outsides to each other double the primary resistance which is still relatively low.

Plugged or unplugged will not affect how coil is hardwired.................
05-10-2013 07:10 PM
mikebontoft
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailor View Post
P.S. - 'beep" when checking the outer two pins of the coil is correct for continuity, should "beep" when touching any combination of pins there.
Actually, I just caught this. It would be the case if the connector were plugged in, but they should not have continuity if it's unplugged. If they did, then it means the connection is grounded.
05-10-2013 07:08 PM
mikebontoft I've got a fluke 88v, but I don't remember what the voltage rating on it is.

AMC, I know static shock has been recorded to at least 60k volts by my instructor. Those were just my test results.
05-10-2013 10:48 AM
sailor No worries amc, I'm just the "go stupid early" guy who asks if it's got gas when the complaint is "doesn't run" (grin)

Tested a lot of motorcycle coils OFF the bike years ago, 'cause people ALWAYS thought it was the coil when they didn't have spark - easier than dealing with them when they wanted to return the electrical part when it didn't solve the problem. Our old Honda tester was set up for basic single post coils, and if you wired a two post the same way it wouldn't spark - Focus coil is like a pair of those, that's why I thought of making sure both sides had a spark path...

Blew up MY favorite Fluke meter years ago with an accidental coil output "zap", it was from an oil furnace spark transformer not an automotive coil but the theory's the same. Touch the wrong thing & you'll be sorry....

Cheers!
05-09-2013 11:24 PM
amc49 I cannot quantify it with a volt number but the most intense shock I ever got was from static built up in PVC pipe (acts like a capacitor), the shock was so violent people said I sprung 4 feet in the air. Cleaned my brain like a wiped hard drive, like electroshock therapy. I did not even know what had happened or even who I was for a good ten or fifteen minutes. Was wondering why everyone was making a big deal out of me lying on the floor. We had another guy who violently went through a sheetrock divider wall where he was working also, got cut pretty bad on the sheet metal girders used to build that stuff.

To me voltmeter and ohmmeter same toy, or VOM (volt/ohm meter). Can't imagine one without the other. I keep analog and digital types around as there are things you can do with one and not the other. I've blown a nice mainboard from simple handling static, I will not send power into a board unless the board maker tells me specifically to do so, regardless of what the meter puts out. Sometimes unless ALL circuits are powered up, powering a single circuit with even the normal amount of power that it runs with can damage things if there is an overlying control circuit that handles that normal power and it is not powered up. Anybody ever plugged in a PC power supply without plugging it into a load to watch it blow up before? The load is the power choke there. I definitely cannot say with auto PCMs, but caution there is warranted to me. Besides that, 99% of the time the problem is elsewhere so why go looking for further trouble.......................
05-09-2013 06:42 PM
mikebontoft that would work. Either way, the induction would be created when you let go of the ground. when you connect the ground, current rises to a limited value and is released when you let it go. That creates the 10k volts or so in the secondary winding.

AMC is kind of correct....should have said ohmmeter and not voltmeter. But yeah, anyway, never test a live circuit for resistance, it's a good way to bust your meter. When testing a computer circuit, you have to make sure you have the right meter. I believe a CATII and CATIII rated meter is fine (in other words, a digital multimeter). Analog multimeters can send too much current through the computer and destroy a circuit. Digitals use a smaller current that is safe. This is kind of the same reason you want to wear a static armband when working on or around computers. I have seen static shock exceed well over 20k volts a few times when I was playing with my meter.

But yes! as mentioned, all the beeps mean is that there is some kind of continuity...that a complete circuit has been made. The question is, does that circuit have too much or too little resistance? Too much, and there's too little current to be useful. Too little, and the current could be high enough to pop a fuse or melt a wire.
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