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Topic Review (Newest First)
01-27-2013 10:28 AM
jeff_nc
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsr72 View Post
Doubtful. Federal Safety standards permit up to twenty minutes of detection time before warning lamp illumination.

You can read some of the background with regards to detection time and threshold safety standard here.

Interestingly:

In its comments, Hyundai American Technical Center, Inc. / Kia Motors Corporation (Hyundai) provided yet another recommendation regarding low tire pressure detection time, stating that the time period for detection and verification of low tire pressure under the standard should be extended to at least 20 minutes. Hyundai stated that delivery frequency for data from the direct TPMS tire pressure sensor to the main control unit can take as long as three minutes, which is a function of Federal Communications Commission (FCC) requirements that limit signal transmissions and the capacity of the battery in the sensor. In addition, Hyundai stated that a number of transmissions may be required to correctly diagnose low tire pressure. Therefore, if a wireless data error occurs, Hyundai argued that the TPMS may not be able to gather sufficient data within the NPRM's proposed 10-minute time limit to assess the vehicle's tire pressures. Accordingly, Hyundai argued that the final rule should permit at least 20 minutes for low tire pressure detection in order to give the TPMS sufficient time to gather enough data to make an accurate assessment.
Wow, that's fascinating. Sadly, for me with mostly short trip driving, this makes TPMS useless. Sigh...
01-27-2013 12:32 AM
Bolto
Quote:
Originally Posted by pozi240 View Post
You do NOT need a special "tool" to train the sensors, I've done the procedure described in no 1 above (there is some YouTube videos that shows the procedure as well) on my F150, Focus, my wife's Escape and several friends newer Ford's (2011 Taurus, 2012 Fusion ) and it worked on all of them. If it didn't work for you, you missed a step, no biggie, try again. BTW, for those that missed the earlier threads on the subject, the sensors will automatically get picked up by the BCM in your car, which will turn out the warning light. However, if you want the car to know the position (location ) of each individual tpms, you'll have to "train" them as laid out in the procedure. Now your car will know which tire is low, not that it will actually tell you (well, at least US built models), other markets may have different BCM firmware that will not only display the offending low tire, but the pressure readings of all 4 tires.
Dang, I wished I was just doing something wrong so that I didn't have to buy the tool, but I tried it half a dozen times and got tired of having to refill the tire up after the car kept telling me the training failed. A few other people couldn't get it to work it either, so I'm not the only one who was missing something. But it definitely doesn't hurt to give it a shot or two.
01-26-2013 10:56 PM
pozi240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bolto View Post
Yup, training the sensors will make the sensors operate correctly; your dealership can do it, and if you didn't get the wheels there, they might charge you for it.

Or you can do it yourself one of two ways:

1. Follow this thread and you may be able to train without a reset tool; however, it didn't work for me, and I ended up buying the reset tool: http://www.focusfanatics.com/forum/showthread.php?t=301692

2. This is the reset tool that I trained my sensors with; just search tpms reset on this forum and you'll come up with a bunch of thread on how to easilly do it: http://www.amazon.com/Motorcraft-TPM...cus+tpms+reset
You do NOT need a special "tool" to train the sensors, I've done the procedure described in no 1 above (there is some YouTube videos that shows the procedure as well) on my F150, Focus, my wife's Escape and several friends newer Ford's (2011 Taurus, 2012 Fusion ) and it worked on all of them. If it didn't work for you, you missed a step, no biggie, try again. BTW, for those that missed the earlier threads on the subject, the sensors will automatically get picked up by the BCM in your car, which will turn out the warning light. However, if you want the car to know the position (location ) of each individual tpms, you'll have to "train" them as laid out in the procedure. Now your car will know which tire is low, not that it will actually tell you (well, at least US built models), other markets may have different BCM firmware that will not only display the offending low tire, but the pressure readings of all 4 tires.
01-26-2013 08:51 PM
Bolto
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeff_nc View Post
Is this something my Ford dealership will do? And will it change the behavior of waiting 20 miles before sounding the alarm?
Yup, training the sensors will make the sensors operate correctly; your dealership can do it, and if you didn't get the wheels there, they might charge you for it.

Or you can do it yourself one of two ways:

1. Follow this thread and you may be able to train without a reset tool; however, it didn't work for me, and I ended up buying the reset tool: http://www.focusfanatics.com/forum/showthread.php?t=301692

2. This is the reset tool that I trained my sensors with; just search tpms reset on this forum and you'll come up with a bunch of thread on how to easilly do it: http://www.amazon.com/Motorcraft-TPM...cus+tpms+reset
01-26-2013 08:50 PM
jsr72
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeff_nc View Post
And will it change the behavior of waiting 20 miles before sounding the alarm?
Doubtful. Federal Safety standards permit up to twenty minutes of detection time before warning lamp illumination.

You can read some of the background with regards to detection time and threshold safety standard here.

Interestingly:

In its comments, Hyundai American Technical Center, Inc. / Kia Motors Corporation (Hyundai) provided yet another recommendation regarding low tire pressure detection time, stating that the time period for detection and verification of low tire pressure under the standard should be extended to at least 20 minutes. Hyundai stated that delivery frequency for data from the direct TPMS tire pressure sensor to the main control unit can take as long as three minutes, which is a function of Federal Communications Commission (FCC) requirements that limit signal transmissions and the capacity of the battery in the sensor. In addition, Hyundai stated that a number of transmissions may be required to correctly diagnose low tire pressure. Therefore, if a wireless data error occurs, Hyundai argued that the TPMS may not be able to gather sufficient data within the NPRM's proposed 10-minute time limit to assess the vehicle's tire pressures. Accordingly, Hyundai argued that the final rule should permit at least 20 minutes for low tire pressure detection in order to give the TPMS sufficient time to gather enough data to make an accurate assessment.
01-26-2013 08:02 PM
jeff_nc
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonic_HedgeHog View Post
You've got to get a tool or take your car in. You basically are telling the TPMS sensors they belong to the car and vice versa.
Is this something my Ford dealership will do? And will it change the behavior of waiting 20 miles before sounding the alarm?
01-25-2013 09:05 PM
Sonic_HedgeHog You've got to get a tool or take your car in. You basically are telling the TPMS sensors they belong to the car and vice versa.
01-25-2013 09:01 PM
jeff_nc OP here. Thanks for all the replies. Could someone please explain what "training" or "recalibrating" the sensors means. Thanks.
01-25-2013 02:52 PM
Sonic_HedgeHog It took my car 5 days and about 60 miles to register the TPMS fault... Then while transporting my stockers in the hatch it resaw them in a matter of minutes
01-25-2013 02:43 PM
gsxrboy Same here, I installed winters without TPMS and every day I get a system warning, I press OK and I am good to go. It doesn't bother me having the warning come up, I knew when I purchased my winters that this was going to happen.
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